Q:
The programme for the MSA's Team UK programme has been announced so what can you tell us about the new crop?

David Brabham:
Well I feel we have an exciting crop of drivers coming through. We have kept three from last year and have added some new blood in the shape of some more promising talent coming through. We will be working with seven race drivers and three rally drivers, as well as the three co-drivers from those rally drivers for the first time. Nicky Grist will be working with them and Mark Higgins will continue as rally coach and it's a great thing to be involved in as the programme develops every year and gets stronger. More money becomes available for us to use and I wish I had a package like it around me when I was a young driver coming through the ranks.

Q:
How do you feel the 2010 drivers did as the first ones who were part of the new Team UK initiative?

David Brabham:
I think they did pretty well. Some didn't reach the targets they wanted to, but it isn't just about helping them in the current era, but also about establishing the foundations they need for their future career. It is what they will do five years down the line and what they will do with their careers that matters and we still speak to guys who have gone through the scheme in the past. It's an ongoing process and it's a strong programme for the driver to develop into someone that the big teams will want.

Q:
How much satisfaction do you get from helping the younger drivers?

David Brabham:
I love it. I have learned a lot during my career and passing on my knowledge is something that I enjoy. I think any teacher would say that when you help people, it also helps yourself so it is almost a two way process. I've been doing it for four years and there are another two years on the contract with the MSA to run the programme and we are always keen to develop it. To do that alongside the success I have had in the last fours in my own racing has been fantastic.

Q:
So what gives more pleasure. Standing on the podium yourself or seeing one of the drivers you are mentoring being successful?

David Brabham:
They are both enjoyable but in different ways. When you win a race, you have to work hard, prepare well and get the best from yourself and the people around you, so you have got it all right when you are on the top of the podium. To watch a young driver stand on the podium and know you have been part of it by helping them also feels great but we can only show them what to do and it is up to them to listen to what we say and learn for themselves. When you see them win, you know they are putting it all together.

Q:
It's one thing to mentor the younger drivers but another altogether to mentor the next generation of the Brabham family coming through...

David Brabham:
Yes exactly. My son, Sam, has been on and off karting for a few years and hasn't done as much as we would have liked but it is slowly coming together for him and this year we are looking to put him into Formula Kart Stars and are putting together the programme for that. He absolutely loves racing and you can see on his face that he adores it. He goes out there and does his karting with its ups and downs but he is still in his learning stage. I can remember when I was at that stage and you think you have cracked it and then the next day, something goes wrong and you think 'Why the hell did that happen?' He is going through that and it's exciting to see.

Q:
Have you not been in the game long enough to worry about the effect this could have on your bank balance in the coming years?

David Brabham:
That's why we are looking at how we can put this altogether! I can't bankroll his racing and we are always looking for partners who can help him out in his career as I can't do that all on my own. He has a good name which helps on occasions and being so close to me, you also get a piece of me as well and that might help in the future.

Q:
Could the name be a hindrance in a way because of the success associated with it? Is it something you had to deal with yourself?

David Brabham:
Let's put it this way. I don't think it matters what we did as kids - and when I say we I mean myself and my brothers Gary and Geoff - it will always be overshadowed by what dad did, and we have achieved quite a lot. Sam will probably have that blanket around him the whole time but you have to go out there and do what you do and make a career for yourself. Sam has to do that.

I think the third generation of the Brabham family, such as Sam and Geoff's son Matthew, might find it a bit easier because the generation gap becomes a bit bigger. I think Geoff always had it the hardest because he was the first 'son of' and he had a difficult time to shake that off so people knew him as Geoff Brabham. It was only when he went to the States and won the Supervee title, a Can-Am championship and four IMSA titles, raced at Indianapolis and then won Le Mans that he really established himself as himself. Hopefully the third generation will have it easier.

Q:
What would it meant to have a third generation F1 driver?

David Brabham:
It would mean a lot for any family - and certainly for us. If they have a dream and reach their dream then it is fantastic. However, if they have done it and enjoyed it, it doesn't matter if it is F1, sportscars or touring cars.

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