F1 » Webber: Wanting the knife-edge


In the third of four articles devoted to Mark Webber, the Australian shares his views on the changing face of F1...

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Bradenws

November 08, 2013 11:03 AM

The only major difference he pointed out is that the tires are inadequate for actual racing. Even in the days of the tire war, someone could overcook, flat-spot, grain, or just plain wear out his tires faster, so that point is moot. Like Webber said, just add DRS and KERS, and little beyond that has actually changed.

Ptolemy

November 08, 2013 2:38 PM

I want to see the guys running naturally aspirated internal combustion engines WITHOUT electric assist. I want to see them running flat out every lap. I wannna hear the banshee wail of the V10s again!
Sure, limit all the electronic trickery like traction control and diffuser blowing.
I guess the "Schumacher Era of Dominance" was possibly the best era F1 has ever seen. I for one wouldn't be opposed for them taking those old cars out of mothballs and hangaring all the new DRS/KERS cars and letting the boys REFUEL and CHANGE tires during the race with ANY manufacturer that is willing to fight in F1.
This environmentalist and money saving nonsense has detracted from the sport. In fact these new fuel economy V6 turbos have and will waste more money and possibly do more damage to the environment through logistics and development costs.

janhein

November 08, 2013 8:50 PM

the inadequacy of the tyres is a big change.

it is not a moot point just because you can damage any tyre by making mistakes. without making mistakes you can go a lot faster on a tyre that is made to make the car go as fast as it can, and for as long as possible.

webber says that because of these new, inadequate tyres more people can drive in formula1, and the drivers with exceptional talent lose their edge. great.

back to multiple tyre suppliers please.

bobsmyname

November 08, 2013 9:25 PM

I really liked the Pirelli tires in 2011 - I thought they really threw a cat amongst the pigeons.

Of course the idea was to spice up the racing and promote more overtaking, but at the same time as the new tires, they introduced DRS.

Now we had 2 mechanisms that promote overtaking at the same time - it's a bit akin to using a sledgehammer to drive in a nail - a bit OTT.

I'm a Button fan and enjoy when drivers can think while they race and perhaps use their tires a little more intelligently, but I agree they have gone a little far now.

Bring back durable tires and keep DRS and KERS, just like Webber said!

Taipan

November 08, 2013 10:51 PM

Bob, I don't disagree with what you're saying but why not just allow a degree of ground effects?
When it was around in the early '80's it was a bit over the top, misunderstood, uncontrolled and ultimately dangerous. All of those things could be addressed nowadays. It provides the closest racing possible and the ability to overtake without the need for gizmos.

The perfect formula? 900bhp, limited ground effects, steel brake disks, refuelling and a manual gearbox. It's never going to happen but it would make for a great series.

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