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Friday press conference - Chinese GP - Pt.2

Team principals: Eric Boullier (Renault), Colin Kolles (HRT), Adam Parr (Williams), Peter Sauber (BMW Sauber).
Questions from the floor.


Q: (Jie Wu – Autonews China).
I have a question for Mr Sauber. The Sauber team became a private team again when you took it over. What's the difference in atmosphere and Formula One environment between when BMW took over the team and now? What has changed?

Peter Sauber:
I think the atmosphere was good as a works team as well as a private team. I think the atmosphere was also very good with BMW, there is no difference. For sure, the team is now much smaller, it's about a third smaller than before with 260 employees. For sure it's more a family than a big company.

Q: (Jie Wu – Autonews China).
There have been lots of manufacturer teams in F1; what's the difficulty for private teams to survive and fight for their dreams in F1?

PS:
Some of those factory teams have left Formula One. I think about three of the big ones and I think that today we have a good combination between big teams and private teams. It's the same question (of survival) for Williams and Hispania. It was a big question for Williams over the last forty years. It's very difficult. When we look back to the last 20 years, more than 25 teams have left Formula One. It's difficult, yes.

Colin Kolles:
I think Adam knows that it's an even bigger amount.

Adam Parr:
Well, the number is over 50 teams since 1970, I think, have failed to survive in Formula One. There are two things: one is yes, it's difficult, and it's always difficult because you're raising… the discretionary part of your income is from sponsorship, and sponsorship is something that people can chose to do or chose not to do, and I think that even though Formula One offers incredible value for sponsors, it's always a big decision for a company to come into Formula One. Having said that, I think that things are better and I think they are going to get better because having only two manufacturers left in Formula One means that the majority of the teams are very realistic about having to raise a budget and they don't want to burn money, and even the manufacturer teams who are left don't want to burn money either. So I think that within this so-called resource restriction agreement, we have a structure to continue to reduce costs for everybody and I think there's a real will to do that. Although it's tough, I think it's promising and it's certainly better… when I started, you could argue that ten out of eleven teams were effectively factory-funded teams or shareholder-funded teams. So it's a lot better now.

Q: (Joe Saward – Grand Prix Special).
Regarding the tyre supply next year, it seems like there's a choice between having a big brand or cheap tyres. Which would you like to have?

CK:
Tyres for free.

PS:
Yeah, for sure, tyres for free, it's possible but I think more importantly is that we have only one tyre supplier.

Eric Boullier:
First we need to have tyres, if possible for free and it doesn't matter if it's a big brand or not, there's obviously a safety issue as well, to have proper tyres. Then, as part of the show, we need to decide if it's only one tyre spec or not. But we need tyres.

AP:
I think there are at least half a dozen companies in the world who could provide us with good quality tyres, that would give a good show and be perfectly safe. I think they are all good companies with good brand names and I think it's absolutely essential that we do a good deal, which means free tyre supply for the teams. Secondly, it must be the same for everybody in all aspects because if it's a standard tyre, it's simply not on to have a two tier or a different approach for one team rather than another. So I think we've got a bit of work to do there. Fortunately, we have Bernie (Ecclestone) who has been asked by the F1 Commission to negotiate and find that supply and nobody's better equipped to do it than him, so I'm sure we will get what we need.

Q: (Joe Saward – Grand Prix Special).
Can I follow up with a question about engines? We're talking about having two manufacturers. In fact we have two manufacturers who have just gone into a very large industrial alliance together, which, logically speaking, when it comes to creating new engines for 2013, are not going to both spend the same kind of money to compete against one another. Do you see a situation whereby we only have Ferrari and small, specialist manufacturers, the Cosworths of this world, in the future?

PS:
Yes, we will drive with Ferrari engines. It's not a problem for us.

CK:
And we drive Cosworth.

PS:




Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Eric Boullier, Team Principal, Renault F1 Team
Colin Kolles, Team Principal, Hispania Racing F1 Team
Peter Sauber (SUI), BMW Sauber F1 Team, Team Advisor
Friday Practice 2, Peter Sauber (SUI), BMW Sauber F1 Team, Team Principal

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