QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR

Q: (Paolo Ianieri - La Gazzetta dello Sport)
Fernando, we saw that in qualifying in Canada you were pretty close to Vettel and here, with the outlawing of changing engine mapping between qualifying and the race, some are feeling that Red Bull may be penalised so do you think that this is your chance to try to get pole?

Fernando Alonso:
I don't know. Hopefully. I don't think it will massively change qualifying. I think Sebastian was quickest in qualifying. It's true that it wasn't one second, it was two tenths, but he was the quickest in wet conditions at the start of the race. We were following him and he was nearly eight tenths or nine tenths quicker than us on Sunday with race mapping. We saw a superior car at that moment, a dominant car, the Red Bull, in qualifying and in the race as well. It seems that sometimes they push a little bit more, sometimes a little bit less. Because of that, in races you seem a little bit closer. We are not desperate to get pole here or to win this race. We need to know where we are at the moment; we need to keep working, to keep working in the direction we took two races ago, as I said. It seems that we are more competitive but we cannot under-estimate or forget how quick our opponents are.

Q: (Livio Oricchio - O Estado de Sao Paulo)
Mark, what's your opinion about this: suddenly the officials have discovered that the exhaust systems that all the teams are using are illegal.

Mark Webber:
There's always something floating around in our sport, isn't there? We know that. We had the double diffuser a few years ago; some people say it's right, some people say it's wrong and now we obviously have the exhaust thing which is their interpretation. Obviously it's not within the spirit of the rules so we change the rules. Obviously it would have been very, very cost effective for all of the teams to know this before the season started because everyone was already looking at it at the end of last year. Obviously, you look at the people from Enstone [Lotus-Renault] and those guys have done a huge, huge job, packaging their car and designing their concept around something like this working. So it's not a trivial thing to throw into the middle of the season for the teams but they will all adjust. Everyone is in the same boat so yeah, [change it] either at the start or at the end [of the season], but in the middle - it makes it a little bit more difficult, but it's the same for everyone. We're not overly concerned. I'm not sitting here saying they shouldn't have done it, it's just that it's not a cheap exercise for people to make adjustments off the back of that.

Q: (Julien Febreau - L'Equipe)
Jaime, what is your situation with your Toro Rosso? There are rumours that Daniel Ricciardo could jump into the car to race even this year, or alternatively, if we listen to your boss, there is maybe a chance of you driving for Red Bull for you or S?bastien next year? What is your situation for the rest of this season and what about next year?

Jaime Alguersuari:
Well, at the moment... I've said so many times that I think both of us and the team are still developing the car, still working on the car a lot. As I said before, I still have to learn lots of things, just to develop lots of things on the set-up of the car to feel better. I don't know about the situation regarding the future, because I always try to do the best that I can at every single race. I try to enjoy it because this is my job and if I was not enjoying my job, I wouldn't be here. This is the first thing to do and yeah, I'm quite relaxed, quite confident because I know what I can do, what are my possibilities and at the moment the situation is what it is. I'm here with Toro Rosso, a fantastic team, a good family and lots of things to learn still, lots of things to see, to develop, to work on and as I said, I hope to be in this race again. I hope to do a good race. I'm still learning, still developing the car until the end of the year.

Q: (Alex Popov - RTR)
Kamui, two weeks ago, you drove a beautiful race but after the finish, two different drivers - Nico Rosberg and Nick Heidfeld - accused you of deliberately braking or at least lifting off just in front of them. Your reaction, and I will also ask Mark to comment, because you know well the danger of this type of situation.

Kamui Kobayashi:
If you want, I can show you the data. I have nothing... Off the line, because only the car is able to stay on the track and I was really pushing. The front tyre lost the grip line, the clean line and I couldn't change the car's direction. I just had to wait otherwise I would be completely on the wet part. I tried to do the best thing, but this was coming from a bit of overdriving.

Mark Webber:
I think people at hairpins are always trying to mix up the pace a little bit, particularly in Canada. Michael was also doing a good job to make the rhythm a little bit different each lap; that's normal. But obviously hitting the brakes is a different story. Obviously if you're a bit later, a bit earlier on the throttle, that's part of racing but if you're playing with the brake pedal it's obviously not something that we all agree to. I'm sure he's not playing these tricks

Q: (Paolo Ianieri - La Gazzetta dello Sport)
I have a question for Mark and Fernando: you were also in this situation a few years ago when you were with Renault and you had the mass damper which the FIA said was OK and then it was banned by the Federation. Now it looks like there are a lot of new rules which prejudice against Red Bull. Do you think that fans can accept this, do you not think that it's not serious to continually change the rules, new rules, yes, no and how can they accept it? Do you not think that it's not very serious to change the rules continuously: new rules, yes, no, perhaps, we don't know if this is legal or not?

Mark Webber:
I think the majority of the fans aren't that bothered, to be honest. They just want to see what they have been seeing so far this year which is a lot of interesting car races. They basically have ten to fifteen per cent knowledge of what's going on behind the scenes in our sport. They just want to watch a good car race actually. You have really, really hard core fans, obviously, who understand a bit more but most people want to see a good car race so they obviously have no idea of the politics that go on in the background at this level, because they will always be there. But they're obviously making these decisions because they think it's the right thing for whatever reason it is, so you need to ask the guys who are making the decisions, why they make the decisions. I don't... or the team. You design a Formula One car at the start of the season to a very very, very tight, strict regulation and go through the fine print as much as you can and then obviously there is a massive, massive conceptual change with that design book in the middle of the year. That's the way it is and we have to get on with it.

Q: (Toni Lopez - La Vanguardia)
Fernando, last year in Monza you said that with six, seven races to the end, you need to be on the podium to have a chance at the title and you got it at the end. This year, what do you think you need to have to have a chance to fight for the title?

Fernando Alonso:
I think we need to have the best car. If we have the best car we can win the title because there is plenty of time and plenty of races to recover. If we are fifth or sixth, as we are normally in qualifying etc, it's very difficult because you cannot get the pace that everybody is doing. I think the championship is long. We need to concentrate, race by race. We will try to be on the podium, we will try to win every race we do. Obviously this is sometimes very difficult or impossible but this is our aim. We are Scuderia Ferrari Marlboro so this is our goal but, as I said, we need to respect our opponents and we need to understand that in some places, in some races we cannot do that. This is also some pressure that you have when you are at Ferrari or when you are Ferrari. You need to win every race that you do, you need to win every championship that you do and despite these seven races when I think I drove the best seven races of my career, with the best qualifying laps, compared to my teammate, compared to last year, comparing different years, the starts etc, even with that, it seems that the season has been a very bad season so far, which, in some ways I agree with, because we are Ferrari, we are obliged to win every race but in some other ways, I think we need to understand and respect our rivals and to work harder than them and to close that gap in the near future.

Q: (Toni Lopez - La Vanguardia)
Jaime, after your result in Canada, do you think that you're in front with a new championship for you in terms of confidence?

Jaime Alguersuari:
I hope so. We've been working a lot on the set-up of the car, the performance of the car. Until now I didn't really feel I got the best out of it. You were just still working a lot on the simulator, on the car. I think Canada was a good result for us. I think Monaco was also a good race for us, despite the crash at the end, but I think I was going to be a points finisher again. So in general we are doing good racing. We had some issues with big tyre degradation which really limited our performance in the past, as in Barcelona and Istanbul, so we had to pit once more. I think so, yeah, I think it's a new championship for us. I think it's a new challenge, for sure.

Q: (Gary Meenaghan - The National)
Jaime and Fernando, can you just talk a little bit about Spain's relationship with Formula One, when you were growing up, and what it was like, and also how it has developed over the years?

Fernando Alonso:
Well, when I was a kid, Formula One was not important at all, or was not a sport we followed. I never saw a race on TV in my life until I was 17 or 18. I was already in Formula Nissan so when I was racing in go-karts I never saw a Formula One race; some news at the end of the year, who was World Champion, who was not World Champion but obviously we didn't know any of the names that were racing. Now, I think it's quite popular in Spain. People love this sport and it's true that it's quite complex, as Mark said, with some regulation changes every year etc. It's not easy for the fans to follow but anyway, I think they love their motorsport as we love motorbikes as well in this country. Generally, I think in go-karts and in different categories now there are many drivers so I'm sure that from now on the future will be much better for Spain and I'm happy because it's obviously my sport and something that I love and now I'm happy that the country shares this love as well.

Mark Webber:
He's being modest because he changed the sport in this country: what he did, no four wheels before him so he did a good job.

Jaime Alguersuari:
I think Spain has always been a motorbike country, especially for the riders and so on. As Mark was saying, when Fernando came and he won both titles and so on, it changed TV coverage and for sure there are more drivers coming up and developing themselves in karting as well. I was already in karting when he won his first championship in 2005, I think and then I stepped into the Red Bull Junior team so I never thought about reaching Formula One because I was in go-karting in Italy and Europe so I was just trying to do my best in go-karts. I was having fun there and then when I had the possibility to step up into Red Bull, I obviously had the chance to one day get to Formula One but I started doing Formula Renault and so on but I never thought about reaching Formula One because I would never... no I was just trying to have fun and do my best.

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