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Post-race press conference - Japanese GP - Pt.1

James, you have brought a lot of stuff this race. It's an important race for one of your drivers. How has the testing gone during the session?

James Key:
It has been okay. We had a lot of new bits. It wasn't just pure aero parts, there were mechanical parts involved in the bits we brought so we were pretty methodical this morning going through everything to check the affects of what we brought to make sure there were no hidden issues. That seemed to be okay. This afternoon we have been working more with the package that we have. The balance of the car needs improving at the moment, but the numbers we are seeing, the data all stacks up to what we expected, which is the most important thing. So I think so far so good but there is certainly some work to do this evening to get more out of it at the moment.

Q:
Was that an effect from Force India pushing you or was it already planned?

JK:
It was always planned to have an update for Suzuka. We have pushed it fairly hard recently because of Force India's good form of late but this time last year we set out when the major packages we wanted to introduce would be targeted for and Suzuka was the last major package of the year so we always had a plan to come here with some new parts.

Q:
Paddy, interesting that both your drivers spoke about better straight-line speed now and also a better rear wing for qualifying. How has that happened?

Paddy Lowe:
Well we have a new rear wing which is better for qualifying! The principal difference between qualifying and the race is the DRS so it doesn't take a rocket scientist to work out that that is the reason. We have a wing and we have made a step on the difference between DRS on and off. That was the wing, actually, that we had in Singapore. Originally intended for this race but we managed to bring it early to Singapore.

Q:
In terms of the rules talking about DRS, what changes for 2012? How have you been able to develop for 2012?

PL:
This was the first year using it obviously so for all the teams it was a big learning curve. A big area, a big opportunity to make a difference against your competitors. The rules next year are exactly the same with the DRS so we will see the technology will mature more. Probably we will see less differences between the teams in terms of DRS effect. But we will still find more bit by bit.

Q:
Just going back to DRS it was slightly more complicated than just opening and closing the flap?

PL:
Do you mean in terms of how it works through the race and though the event?

Q:
Yes.

PL:
I think it has been a fascinating area for this year not just for the actually race and the entertainment it has given with easier overtaking which I think has transformed the nature of races. Technically it has been fascinating. It has added a whole new dimension to the process of selecting the best wing for an event. It used to be quite a one dimensional task, run a wing, have a little look at what your competitors were doing as well iterate through the weekend to the right wing level. Now you have an extra dimension which is what is your qualifying pace, what's your race pace with the DRS, without it, and even with the complication that if it is raining in qualifying then you cannot use the DRS. You might have to factor that in if it's a weekend with potential rain. Lots of complicated sums for the guys to do in the office with the computers to work out what's the best plan.

Q:
Adrian, Kamui Kobayashi said yesterday that one of the great strengths of Sebastian Vettel's was his ability to communicate to the engineers. Tell us about that and his other strengths.

Adrian Newey:
He is a very bright young lad who thinks a lot about what he does. Takes a lot of time to try and understand the car, understand his own performance. Like most good drivers he has a good feeling for the car. He is very strong in some areas. He has a very good feeling for the tyres, what can I say.

Q:
Is that communication though something that stands out as you have worked with many drivers over the years?

AN:
I think Sebastian is very gifted naturally but he works hard at it and that is always the hallmark of a great driver.

Q:
Some of the drivers you've worked with, have they worked as hard or can you just see an extra dimension from him?

AN:
Pass.

Q:
In terms of today, how are your feelings about today? It is interesting three manufacturers in the first three places.

AN:
It's Friday, what can I say. It's the usual thing on a Friday. We don't know exactly what fuel loads people are running and everybody is trying to understand what suits their car on the day. I think Friday, get on and do your own job and then Saturday and Sunday you start to find out where you are.

Q:




Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
22.09.2011- Adrian Newey (GBR), Red Bull Racing , Technical Operations Director
06.10.2011- Pat Fry (GBR), Technical Director (Chassis), Scuderia Ferrari
James Key, Sauber F1 launch, Valencia, 2011 [pic credit: Sauber Media]
27.08.2011- Qualifying, Adrian Newey (GBR), Red Bull Racing , Technical Operations Director

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