Team representatives: Jean Francois Caubet (Renault F1 Sport), Monisha Kaltenborn (Sauber), Vijay Mallya (Force India), Adam Parr (Williams) and Franz Tost (Toro Rosso).

Press conference

Q:
A question to you all about your initial thoughts about India and the circuit. Franz, first of all?

Franz Tost:
India, so far, I don't know very well, as I just arrived yesterday and my first impression is quite positive regarding here, the race track. I must say that the team around Sameer Gaur has done a fantastic job as the track itself is very interesting. Long straights, slow corners, fast corners, our drivers are really excited about the track. There are a couple of possibilities for overtaking. In general it is very important for Fq that we are racing in India - that we go to these new markets that are interesting and important for the future, like India, like China, Russia, the Arabian area, South America. These are the markets for the future and this is important for our sponsors, to bring in more sponsors as F1 is racing every second weekend. For F1 itself this is very, very important and thanks also to Bernie [Ecclestone] for doing this, as in the end he is negotiating and coming up with this these new tracks.

Adam Parr:
I would agree with everything that Franz has said. I would just add that India is a spectacular country and very colourful, very vibrant, and always has been. Being here is very exciting for us as a team and as a sport and being able to 'play' here is important if we are to be a global sport, so we are thrilled. I would just like to say thank you very much to the promoters here for putting on such a fantastic event and for publicising it so well in the country and making F1 feel so welcome.

Jean Francois Caubet:
For Renault, India is a strategic market for the future. We have three strategic markets in the future, India, Russia and Brazil so to race here is very important. We are building a huge factory in the south, in Chennai, and it is a pleasure to race here and I hope that the engine will be, probably, winning.

Q:
Monisha, you must be very excited to be here?

Monisha Kaltenborn:
I am very excited, and to start, I fully agree with what Franz and Adam said about the place here, about the track. We received a very warm welcome here. What I am very surprised about, pleasantly surprised, is the way the Indian media have been covering the whole event so far. I mean the amount of in-depth information they give about the sport, the rules, what is important, technical aspects, it is very unique. I have never seen that before in this depth and from a personal point of view, of course, I am very excited to have this link now between the job and the country where I come from, so it is a very special race.

Q:
Vijay, also you must be very excited and very proud of what you have seen today?

Vijay Mallya:
Well, my views are very, very partial. I have a huge vested interest. Over 30 years ago I drove my Ensign Formula One car here in India and I never thought I would ever see a F1 car race around India in the future. As the chairman of the ASN responsible for motorsport here, we have been trying to promote motorsport in this country for over three decades and this is like a dream come true. When I acquired the then Spyker team, I re-named it Force India and there was a lot of strategy and meaning behind it, as it was meant to put India on the F1 map. We have had an Indian team since 2008 on the F1 grid and now a grand prix here in Delhi. This is unbelievably fantastic.

Q:
A technical question for you all about engines. It is getting to the sharp end of the championship when the eight engines are perhaps getting a bit tired, when you are perhaps running out. We saw a couple of engine failures today. What is your engine situation in your particular team. Franz?

FT:
So far I must say that Ferrari has done a fantastically good job. We have not had an engine failure. I hope this stays like it is until the end of the season. Also with KERS.

Q:
Adam, you had an engine failure today. What's the situation with the AT&T Williams team?

AP:
Well we have, I think, two fresh engines left for the remainder of the season, so we are on track in that sense. We have had some reliability issues actually in the last three weekends, which our partner is working very hard to fix as soon as possible and, obviously, that's critically important for us.

Q:
Jean Francois, perhaps you can summarise three teams.

JFC:
I think we have one engine free for all the teams and I think in terms of reliability I think we will be quite good this year. I don't think there will be a problem.

MK:
Well compared to last year, we definitely have had a better year this year on engines. I hope it goes on like this and we don't suffer any problems.

Q:
So you shouldn't have any problems for the end of the season?

MK:
I hope so, no.

VM:
Well Sahara Force India is committed to putting its best foot forward here on home soil, so we have saved two fresh engines for the race.

Q:
And for the other two races?

VM:
We are alright, we are alright.

Q:
Franz, performance in the last few races has been really good. It must be very useful for next year, and is it a bit of an indication for next year?

FT:
I hope so. Currently, I must say, the car performs quite well. The team has made a step forward. We brought some new modifications to Suzuka and as it looked today I think we can be close to qualifying three. That means both cars should be close to the 10th position and this should enable us to score some points in the race. So far, we are within our schedule and regarding for next year, of course, there is some development work which is going on. The main parts for next year we are testing at the young driver tests days in Abu Dhabi.

Q:
Adam, you have put in place a new technical team. Can you just outline it and tell us how it's going.

AP:
Well the new technical team consists of Mike Coughlan, who we have just confirmed as our new Technical Director. Mike joined us in June. The Head of Aerodynamics joined us in the middle of August, Jason Somerville, and thirdly, Mark Gillan, who is our chief operations engineer looking after the race team. In terms how they are going I think it has been a very positive step for us in a number of respects. First of all, they are all very experienced people. They have a strong aerodynamic interest, particularly amongst Jason and Mark, who worked together as head and deputy head of aero at Toyota, so there is a good understanding between the track and the tunnel. I think they have already had quite an impact on the team at the factory in the sense of people seeing some good direction forward and a good way of working, so that's all positive. They essentially view our existing facilities and resources as being good enough to do a much better job than we are doing today. There are some areas where we need to invest a little bit and we are doing that as fast as we can to really try and take a big step forward for next year.

Q:
Jean Francois, we saw today a couple of engine failures, not yours I hasten to add. Tell us the challenges of this circuit, as it was interesting to have those engine failures. Is it the circuit?

JFC:
No I don't think it is particularly the circuit. It is not too hard for the engine. I think it is a problem of the end of the season. People try on the engine side to be innovative next year and probably they are more looking to next year and 2014 at the end of this season.

Q:
Is there a major or specific challenge at this circuit particularly?

JFC:
No, I don't think we will have a specific challenge here. I think Spa and Monza are worse than here.

Q:
Monisha, you have obviously got a major Indian sponsor for this race. How easy or difficult was it. How much did you target and look for a sponsor for this grand prix?

MK:
Well, I think like everyone else we wanted to also attract Indian companies and it is surprising that there are not many, as yet, in F1, although from the financial potential they are very much capable of doing it. We did try hard and we succeeded in getting one of India's most known, prestigious owned brands with Amul. I think we will continue with that now. An event like this is the best platform, that's where we can present ourselves and show the companies here what F1 is about.

Q:
Vijay, a lot has been happening with the team. If you can outline some of the things that has been going on?

VM:
Well we have been focusing on our performance, of course, and the big news is the fact that we have a new partner in the Sahara group. The Sahara group is one of the largest groups in India and a huge patron and sponsor of sport, sponsor of India's national cricket team amongst other sports in India. We started discussions and they came on board and are investing $100million into the team. They will hold 42.5 per cent equity stake. There is no change of control involved. The team will be Sahara Force India. The chassis name remains. I will continue to run the team but with these additional financial resources our research and development strengths get a significant shot in the arm. But what is more, I think this one big move by a major Indian group will encourage many more.

Q:
Also, you announced the results of your search for 'One in a Billion'.

VM:
The Indian press has constantly been asking me about an Indian driver in our car and I have said 'fine, we will find one'. A couple of years ago I said that amongst 1.2 billion people there must be a Lewis Hamilton somewhere, so we launched this nationwide hunt. We had karting events across the country and finally we chose 10 kids. We took them to Silverstone and to Milton Keynes in the UK and we announced the names of the three winners, well the winner, runner-up and second runner-up yesterday. We are going to send all three to Europe, pay for their education, their advanced driver training and everything. They are under 14-years-old and hopefully in five to six years we will produce an Indian F1 driver.