Max Mosley says he feels the on-going row regarding diffuser designs on the new-look Formula One cars 'will come to a head' during the season-opening Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne next weekend.

Toyota, Williams and Brawn GP have all gone down a different route to their rivals with the design on the diffuser on their cars after utilising a grey area in the regulations - with the remaining teams reported to be unhappy with what they view as an illegal part on the cars in question.

Speaking ahead of the new season, Mosley said he felt that discussions were now likely to take place during the Melbourne race weekend as the row rumbles on, with no possibility of resolving the matter prior to the opening round of the year.

"It's a very clever device and you can make a very good case for saying that it's legal and a very good case for saying that it's illegal," Mosley told the Daily Telegraph. "It's going to be difficult. What's actually happened is that teams are saying 'We think it's illegal for this and this reason.'

"If there had been more time before the detailed objections to the system were sent in, I would probably have sent it to the FIA Court of Appeal before Australia. And actually I have given thought to that this week. But there isn't time. It wouldn't be fair. I think the thing will probably come to some sort of a head in Australia."

Mosley added that the teams would need to try and resolve the situation as soon as possible and said he expected to see some appeals made from the opening races of the year.

"One possibility is that all the teams agree that it is illegal, and therefore all the teams shouldn't have it from Barcelona," he said. "But then those teams who say it is legal will say 'Why should we do that?' And those that say it's illegal will say 'Why should we lose an advantage for four races?'

"And so probably what will happen is it will end up going to the stewards, who will make a decision. That will almost certainly be appealed by whichever side is disadvantaged. And then that will go to our Court of Appeal and be hammered out.

"It's not straightforward. I have an open mind on it at the moment - I can see it going either way. I really can. But somebody has to make their mind up and fortunately it's not my job."