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Politics put Nurburgring at risk

Could political changes affect F1 at the Nurburgring?
A new political alliance in Germany could put the future of F1 at the Nurburgring at risk according to news reports in the German press.

The Nurburgring currently alternates hosting of the German Grand Prix with Hockenheim after the European Grand Prix moved to the streets of Valencia back in 2008.

However, elections in the Rhineland-Palatinate state have seen the ruling SPD party lose its absolute majority, with the green party tripling its vote to lead to the formation of a ruling coalition.

That move could now put any state funding for the Nurburgring race at risk, with the green party keen to put a stop to funding which is used to support the F1 race.

"I have nothing against car racing in the Eifel," green state party chief Daniel Kobler was quoted as telling the DPA news agency. "I just have a problem if tax money is needed to ensure that more millions and billions are reaped in profits (by F1).

"In the negotiations with the SPD, we will work to permanently remove the subsidies for the 'Ring in the foreseeable future."



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Frank Wank - Unregistered

April 20, 2011 4:55 PM

Looks like the Granola munchers are taking over the world. They always seem to feel they know what is best for all of us in their usual smug self serving way. Governments do cough up money to support racing but the money given to bernice is offset by real economic spinoffs for their area. Greenies always pick on racing, yet special events like the Olympics are usually money losers as well, but the positive aspects are undeniable. Green Parties the world over are one trick ponies and their record on the economic fronts are disasters! /

Caroline Reid - Unregistered

April 20, 2011 9:15 PM

In 2008 business consultancy ING rehearsed F1 sanctioning fees, and the subsequent report said that $275 million was invested in races, mostly by national or regional governments, which brought in a total of $1.5 billion into those economies, the equivalent to a rate of return of 553 percent for each race.



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