The inaugural Indian Grand Prix could be moved to the end of the season in order to find room for a rescheduled race in Bahrain.

Bahrain was due to be the season opener before political unrest in the Gulf State forced organisers to cancel the race, with classes between protestors and authorities in the capital city Manama leaving a number of people dead.

A state of emergency that had been declared by the ruling royal family is set to be lifted on 1 June with the FIA then set to rule on whether the race will return to the calendar this season just two days later.

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If Bahrain does return, then questions remain over how the race will be accommodated with one option being to move the Indian race from its current date at the end of October to a date in December - one week after the current finale in Brazil.

The Bahrain race would then take the place of India on 30 October and be run between the events in Korea and Abu Dhabi.

"We are having a look at it," commercial rights holder Bernie Ecclestone told the BBC when asked if the switch of dates could take place. "Everything is possible.

"I'm not sure at the moment what I'm going to do, everything's up in the air. I haven't decided yet, we'll see if we have to go to Bahrain."

SPEED.com points out that the FIA's traditional end-of-season activities will all take place in India rather than Monaco this year, with a reunion of the governing body's World Motor Sport Council (WMSC) on 6 December, the annual Awards Gala a day later and the General Assembly a day later still.

Mercedes Grand Prix team principal Ross Brawn, however, agrees with his Lotus Renault GP counterpart Eric Boullier [see separate story - click here] that the sport's powers-that-be ought to think long and hard before agreeing to reschedule Bahrain, telling German website motorsport-magazin.com that such a move could have a particularly draining effect upon mechanics and engineers, who would consequently face a shorter winter break.

"Our boys, by the end of January, are back to work completely and very busy," the Englishman underlined, "and because of the resource restrictions, we can't put any more people on or employ a second race team."