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Vettel apologies to Red Bull staff

Sebastian Vettel gives a personal apology to Red Bull staff for his actions at Sepang
Sebastian Vettel has visited the Red Bull Racing factory in Milton Keynes to apologise in person for his actions during the Malaysian Grand Prix.

The defending champion ignored team orders and overtook Mark Webber for the lead at Sepang, leaving his team-mate angry despite issuing an apology following the race.

Having returned to Europe prior to the third race of the season in China, Vettel has now apologised to Red Bull staff for his actions in Malaysia – with team boss Christian Horner revealed that the German also vowed that there will be no repeat in future.

"He's said he can't turn back the clock but he's accepted what he did was wrong," Horner was quoted by Reuters.

"He's apologised to the team and to every single member of staff for his actions, because he recognises the team is vitally important and being part of the team is a crucial aspect to being able to challenge for those championships."

Red Bull advisor Helmet Marko has already claimed that the issue was settled after the two drivers shook hands in their debrief following the Sepang race.



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Mark _

March 28, 2013 4:06 PM

If they don't want this to happen again then don't issue stupid team orders. Neither of these guys follow them anyway so just be done with it and let them race. As fans we should be demanding this.

FreeJack - Unregistered

March 28, 2013 5:46 PM

People REALLY need to stop comparing this team order defiance to Silverstone. At Silverstone, BOTH drivers had turned down their engines (by Horner's own admission) and yet they were still competitive...the tearm just didn't want the two of them racing, because the previous year's crash was still fresh on Horner's mind and he wanted the constructor's points. At Sepang, there could be no competition, because Webber had crippled himself by turning down his engines (as agreed upon before the race) and Vettel stayed at full steam. The reason for telling them to hold their positions after the final pit stop was because they didn't know how badly the tires would fall off over 15 laps or so. It wasn't just down to, "We want the points, so maintain the gap." It was, "We don't even know if these tires are going to last through the end of the race, so take it easy on them." There's a difference.



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