F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone has said that he sees no reason why Red Bull would want to leave F1, even though it has won the past four world championship titles.

While runaway success would be largely expected to keep a team interested in competing, F1 remains an expensive business, and there are fears that, having conquered it, Dietrich Mateschitz, who also backs the Toro Rosso squad, may decide to use alternative outlets - and Red Bull has many - to market his products.

Ecclestone, however, is confident that the Austrian, given his love of motorsport and competition, will remain in the top flight for the foreseeable future.

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"Dietrich Mateschitz is so competitive, he loves racing, he likes when his car wins," Ecclestone told an interview with Italy's Gazzetta dello Sport, "The team's success has brought a lot of economic benefits, much more than those of the likes of a Williams or Force India and, where else could he find, for the same price, worldwide coverage so extensive and prestigious for his brand than that offered by F1?"

Of greater note to Red Bull, however, may be the possible loss of the talismanic Sebastian Vettel, who Ecclestone admits could yet be lured by the desire to drive for Ferrari before hanging up his helmet.

"He's so young that, certainly, he will not remain where he is for life," Ecclestone suggested of the 24-year old, "The problem is that all drivers want to finish their career at Ferrari, which is a beautiful thing. Vettel, I think, should go to a team that will help him win more championships, no what team it is. That's what Fangio and Moss did [in their day]."

Vettel will again lead the RBR line-up in 2014 but, with the less experienced Daniel Ricciardo replacing fellow Australian Mark Webber in the #2 seat, it remains to be seen whether the team can be such a force in the constructors' championship.

With a new technical specification being introduced for 2014 too, Ecclestone admits that the current pecking order could be upset.

"There is no guarantee that it will be the best driver who wins the world title," he confessed, "The crown will go to the most fortunate and, at the moment, I do not have a favourite. Next year, fate will be back in the hands of the engines and those who have the best one will win."