Renault insists it has made progress with its 2014 F1 engine despite another troubled week of running in Bahrain.

Although Red Bull, Toro Rosso and Caterham were able to complete more mileage than in Spain during the opening test of the year, none were able to challenge towards the top of the time sheets and continued to encounter some issues with the all new power-plant.

The Bahrain test also saw Lotus hit the track for the first time alongside its rivals and while Pastor Maldonado was able to post the quickest Renault-powered time, it was more than five seconds off the pace set by Nico Rosberg for Mercedes.

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Despite that Renault's deputy managing director (technical) Rob White said he felt the engine supplier was moving in the right direction, even if there was still plenty of work to be done ahead of the final test of the winter at the Sakhir circuit this coming week.

"We have had some set-backs, but we have definitely made progress and have taken several steps forward," he said. "The changes have improved the PU behaviour in the car and we are have accumulated valuable mileage. There have been stoppages, on our side and on the chassis side as well, but we have ironed out some important faults and allowed the teams to gain crucial experience of the car as a whole.

"We have seen that minor incidents can cause downtime that is difficult or impossible to recover. In particular, we lost more time than anticipated on the final day. While we are not at the level of operation and performance we would want to be, we have a more solid basis to work from, and we are moving in the right direction."

White added that Renault now needed to 'accelerate an upward curve' with its development work with just four days of running left before the season opener in Australia

"We are some weeks behind where we wanted to be, and we acknowledge it will take time to unlock the full performance of the Power Unit," he continued. "We are working hard to get there and we are determined to succeed. We remain confident in the PU and its sub systems, we are just not at the level of operation and performance we want to be. The immaturity of the PU combined with the time lost to incidents, means the chassis work to prepare for the season is also behind schedule. From this point on we must pursue and accelerate an upward curve.

"We run again in Bahrain at the end of next week. The homologation deadline is looming, the race engines for Melbourne are in the early stages of build. There is a huge amount of work in progress.

"The Viry team is working night and day to solve our problems. The collaboration with our teams is closer than ever. The rate of development is extremely rapid away from the track and that we can create and validate effective solutions very quickly shows the resolve and tenacity of all our team members.

"We now have a list of issues from this test we will address. There are of course priority calls to sort out the most important ones from the background noise, but we will come back stronger at the next test and continue to learn about the Power Unit and prepare for Melbourne."