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F1 Canadian Grand Prix: Massa fumes at Perez over clash

Felipe Massa believes a five-place grid penalty is not sufficient punishment for Sergio Perez after their high-speed accident in the Canadian Grand Prix
Felipe Massa believes a five-place grid penalty is not sufficient punishment for Sergio Perez after their high-speed accident in the Canadian Grand Prix.

Perez was handed the penalty after the stewards decided he had moved from the racing line and caused the accident at Turn 1 on the final lap of the race which saw both cars spear in to the tyre barrier. Having been discharged from hospital, Massa said he was unhappy that Perez had driven recklessly and said such a small penalty will not make him learn from his mistakes.

“I talked to him here at the medical centre at the track,” Massa said. “I was so disappointed with him I said that he needs to learn. I wanted him to be in my place because I had a huge crash. So I wanted him to be in my place to see if he learns, because it's not the first time that he turned on someone in the braking zone. It's not the first time, he's done it many times.”

Asked if he felt the penalty that Perez was given was sufficient for the incident, Massa replied: “No.

“For sure they have rules for every accident for the positions and these I don't know. I don't know how it works, but for me it's not enough. But what can I say?

“The only thing is that doing that on this occasion we are there at maybe 300km/h. You do that at 300km/h and have another car in front it could have been a very serious accident. It's dangerous. So for me five places is not enough. It was dangerous. Vettel was in front; we could have maybe crashed in to him, so it was dangerous anyway.”

Explaining the incident from his point of view, Massa said it was clear to him that Perez had moved before the braking zone.

“Vettel passed Perez on the main straight and then we went through the chicane – he didn't do a very quick chicane so I did a better chicane than him – and I had DRS and he didn't. So I was much quicker than him on the main straight and then just before the corner I started to move on the left and when we did the corner I had my wheel next to his rear wheel on the left, and then it's a corner to the right.

“Suddenly he moved his car over to my car and then we touched. Normally when you're turning you might start turning but his car went straight in to my car. Then I saw my front wheel went up and then I couldn't brake anymore so I went straight and had a big accident.

“Honestly, it's the rules. We've had the rules for three or four years that if you get part of your car alongside then the other car can't move anymore. He just moved and we touched.

“I think it was before the braking zone. He moved before the braking, for sure.”



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107SS2009

June 09, 2014 5:14 AM

Different opinions are expected and is normal from F1 followers, also opinions are a right of everybody, but it should be remembered that no matter the experience/expertise of those watching a race the stewards of the race are in a much better position to accurately judge things.

Googolplex

June 09, 2014 3:19 AM

The Stewards have carefully scrutinised it from all angles, heard what the drivers have had to say, and made their decision. Felipe was vindicated by their decision but he should now move on. Sure, it was a very dangerous situation and one can understand why he is upset, but F1 is inherently dangerous, mistakes/miscalculations/errors of judgment can be made at high speed exposing others to serious risk, and the participants (who are paid big bucks) presumably accept that.



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