Ferrari's Marco Mattiacci believes that F1's big hitters need to continue pursuing a common-sense objective in talks over the future of the sport.

Talks on both engine development and the preservation of the grid in its current form appeared deadlocked as teams left Sao Paulo at the weekend, with no small degree of frustration emanating from those attempting to secure parity in one or both issues.

Mattiacci, while knowing that Ferrari will remain part of the F1 firmament, is keen to see the Scuderia able to compete with Mercedes next season, but admits that being able to develop the already costly 2014-spec turbo engines is just one ambition in a wider scenario that threatens the very fabric of the sport.

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"I think we should have a serious common agenda to really improve the sport, the revenues, the entertainment," he said, "I don't think it is difficult, but I think it is complex. I think everybody wants a better situation, but we need to find a way to work."

Like Red Bull counterpart Christian Horner, Mattiacci appeared to suggest that a third party continued to scupper progress towards agreement on the issue of 'unfreezing' engines for development, and insisted that Ferrari - so often seen as the wedge between teams in the past - would play its part in achieving a workable future for F1.

"We keep discussing, but there is another player who keeps changing the ideas," he revealed, "But we'll keep working. We don't give up on a very fundamental principal of F1 - that is innovating, that is competing - but probably someone doesn't share this value for F1."

"However, I have to tell you that, at the same time, we must concede that everybody is trying to reach a middle ground. It is clear that it has to be fair enough for everybody to really change what is happening today. I've only been here for five months, so I am not a game-changer in this case, but Ferrari will do, as usual, the utmost to be sure that F1 continues being successful. We need to start talking strategically, not just tactically or to put a patch here and there."

Citing the Scuderia's involvement with Marussia, to whom it provided powertrains this season, as evidence of its desire to support the smaller teams, Mattiacci insisted that the sport needed to focus on the future, even if it moves in different ways to conventional business.

"It's not just the teams at the table, Bernie [Ecclestone] wants to discuss, but we all want to make progress," he confirmed, "We need to see the positives - where F1 started many decades ago and where it is today. [The Brazilian GP] was a fantastic show, the crowd was packed and the whole thing was very successful, so we need to see the positives - it's a way to make sure we go in a direction to make continuous improvement.

"Again, it is a different kind of business, and we cannot apply exactly the same speed and the same methodologies, but we must have the focus, the energy, the positivity to make it happen."