The family of the late Jules Bianchi are to begin legal proceedings against the FIA, Marussia and FOM following the F1 driver's death as a result of injuries sustained during the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix.

The Frenchman passed away in July 2015, nine months after suffering serious head injuries in a collision with a recovery vehicle at Suzuka in October 2014. He was the first driver to die as a result of injuries sustained in an accident during an F1 race since Ayrton Senna in 1994.

Considering his death to have been 'avoidable', the family are pushing ahead with plans to take F1's governing body, the FIA, the team he was driving for at the time, Marussia (now known as Manor Racing), and the commercial rights holder FOM, to court.

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According to the BBC, Bianchi's family consider one or more of the three parties to be held responsible for Bianchi's death.

"Jules Bianchi's death was avoidable," said Julian Chamberlayne, representative of the Bianchi family and partner at Stewarts Law.

"We seek justice for Jules and want to establish the truth about the decisions that led to our son's crash," added Bianchi's father Philippe. As a family, we have so many unanswered questions and feel that Jules' accident and death could have been avoided if a series of mistakes had not been made."

The root of the legal action is set to centre on whether the October 5th race should have gone ahead in the wake of a typhoon that forced the race to be initially stopped after two laps due to poor weather conditions.

The race eventually went ahead again 20mins later in still rainy weather and ran until lap 46 when Bianchi slid off in his Marussia and impacted a mobile crane recovering the stricken Sauber of Adrian Sutil.

Suffering serious head injuries, the Frenchman would remain in a coma for nine months before passing away on July 17th.

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I see both points of view on this - on the one hand, the waved yellows told the drivers they should be prepared to stop... so you may conclude it was the fault of JB.

However, 'common sense' shows that racing drivers will not 'prepare to stop' when they go through yellow flags - it isn't going to happen...

The virtual safety car has been a new improvement which I think will work well in future situations like these.

Unfortunately, motorsport is dangerous, and the danger couldn't (maybe even shouldn't) be fully eliminated, it is part of the sport.

Lessons have been learnt from Jules' crash, and hopefully that will protect a driver in the future.