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Alonso’s Melbourne smash peaked at 46G, FIA confirms

Fernando Alonso endured a peak of 46G in his crash with Esteban Gutierrez at the Australian GP and was travelling at 305kph on point of impact.
Fernando Alonso endured a peak impact of 46G in his heavy crash with Esteban Gutierrez at the Australian Grand Prix and was travelling at 305kph at the point of collision.

In the immediate aftermath of the crash, the McLaren-Honda driver had been considered extremely fortunate to walk away in Australia which saw both his and Gutierrez's car obliterated in the accident, although Alonso was forced to sit out the Bahrain Grand Prix due to broken ribs.

In an extensive analysis and review of the crash completed by the FIA to understand more on what happens to a driver in a high-speed accident, data and video evidence from Alonso's car has revealed the full impact endured.

The FIA has used a new rear-facing high-speed camera to shed light on a driver in the cockpit, plus data recorders and in-ear accelerometers – used in the analysis of the tragic death of Jules Bianchi – recorded the forces and speeds the driver sustained.

It has been confirmed Alonso was traveling at 313kph when he attempted an overtake on Gutierrez, with the initial impact speed slowing fractionally to 305kph.

With his front-right suspension destroyed, Alonso's car veered left and struck the wall causing a peak lateral deceleration of 45G. Rebounding off the wall the car slid into the gravel trap and the damaged left-side of the car dug into the ground causing it to roll and spiking a second lateral deceleration of 46G.

After one-a-half rotations flying through the gravel trap Alonso experienced a final surge of longitudinal acceleration of 20G before coming to a rest just before the tyre barrier.

“The fact that he was relatively unharmed – suffering only minor injuries which forced him to miss the next race – is testament to the safety elements in the car that have been developed over the last 20 years,” the report concluded.



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Stoffel Vandoorne, McLaren MCL32 F1 launch, [Credit: McLaren]
McLaren MCL32, McLaren-Honda, [Credit: McLaren]
Fernando Alonso - McLaren MCL32
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(L to R): Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team with team mate Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1 and the Sahara Force India F1 VJM10.
22.02.2017.
(L to R): Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1 with Alfonso Celis Jr (MEX) Sahara Force India F1 Development Driver and Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team.
22.02.2017.
(L to R): Andrew Green (GBR) Sahara Force India F1 Team Technical Director; Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1; Dr. Vijay Mallya (IND) Sahara Force India F1 Team Owner; Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team; Robert Fernley (GBR) Sahara Force India F1 Team Deputy Team Principal, and the Sahara Force India F1 VJM10.
22.02.2017.
(L to R): Dr. Vijay Mallya (IND) Sahara Force India F1 Team Owner with Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1 and Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team.
22.02.2017.
(L to R): David Croft (GBR) Sky Sports Commentator with Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1 and Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team.
22.02.2017.
(L to R): Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1; Dr. Vijay Mallya (IND) Sahara Force India F1 Team Owner; Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team, with the Sahara Force India F1 VJM10.
22.02.2017.
(L to R): Sergio Perez (MEX) Sahara Force India F1 with team mate Esteban Ocon (FRA) Sahara Force India F1 Team and the Sahara Force India F1 VJM10.
22.02.2017.

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Taipan

June 09, 2016 12:13 PM

There can't be many people who have survived a 45g, 46g and 20g impacts all within a couple of seconds. Amazing that he escaped with just minor injuries, F1 has got a lot wrong in the last 20 years but the advancements in car safety is incredible.

Matt2

June 09, 2016 12:39 PM

1.55G - Acceleration from 0 to 60mph in a Bugatti Veyron 3G - A Space Shuttle during launch 8G - F16 aircraft pulling out of a dive 12G - Typical maximum turn in a fighter jet. 15G - Explosive seat ejection from aircraft. 27G - Felipe Massa’s crash at the Canadian Grand Prix 47G - Kimi Raikkonen's crash at the British Grand Prix 50G - Death or serious injury likely F1 is extremely safe looking how people are walking away from these crashes. The cars are just unbelieveble.



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