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No point talking about penalties, says Kimi.

Out-going world champion Kimi Raikkonen has admitted that penalties - and disputes over them - will always be a part of Formula One simply because thee is so much on the line for its participants.

Speaking in the wake of the controversy surrounding the punishments handed out to Ferrari team-mate Felipe Massa and the Brazilian's title rival, Lewis Hamilton, in Japan last weekend - and with criticism continuing to swirl around the Briton's driving standards - Raikkonen insisted that continuing to discuss the issue was unlikely to solve anything as there would always be multiple sides to the argument.

"I haven't been hurt too badly by any [penalties] but, sometimes, it is difficult to say [whether they are justified or not]," the Finn commented, "Everybody has their own opinions whether it is right or wrong, and that is always going to be the case. Some like it, some not - for me, it is okay - but whatever we say is not going to change much, so there is no point to put too much input in."

Raikkonen did concede, however, that new drivers were ever going to make such a perilous move as to put anyone at risk.

"It is a dangerous sport so, when you race against somebody, you try to make sure that, first of all, you want to get round him and not crash into him because it's not going to help you or him," he explained, "But, sometimes, you get it wrong. When you push on the limit, and both guys try to go as fast as possible in a corner and not try to let the other guy past, sometimes you end up hitting each other - and that's racing.

"The rules are quite tight. Sometimes you get penalised, sometimes not, but, as I said, there are always many different views of the same incidents or the same situations. There is always going to be talk about penalties and stuff, but that's unfortunately going to be a big part of Formula One. It's not always best for the sport, but we're here to race and try to get past people. Sometimes, you get penalties out of it, even when you don't think it's right, but that's how it goes."

Raikkonen could have been speaking from experience, having gone wheel-to-wheel with BMW Sauber's Robert Kubica several times during last weekend's race at Fuji in jus the circumstances that he was describing. On that occasion, however, there was no contact between the pair, and Kubica survived to hold on to second place.

The Pole consequently had little to complain about after the race, unlike the days leading up to it, when he launched into another attack on former karting rival Hamilton. Whether determined to prove Kubica wrong, or simply too fired up after fluffing the start from pole, Hamilton caused a fracas at turn one of the Japanese Grand Prix, delaying himself, Massa and Raikkonen amongst others.

The Briton received a drive-thru' penalty for the incident which removed any chance he had of adding to his points tally, but the incident only served to hasten his rivals' eagerness to discuss the matter with him.

"I think there is nothing more to comment [publicly] on," Kubica noted when cornered on the issue during Thursday's media call in Shanghai, "When one driver is overtaking another and crossing his line just in front of his wheel, it's quite dangerous, especially if someone behind has to lift off. I have been involved in an accident in a similar situation in Canada and I know what it means when a front wheel hits a rear wheel. From my point of view, it's quite dangerous.



Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Robert Kubica (POL) BMW Sauber.F1.08, Kimi Raikkonen (FIN) Ferrari F2008, Bahrain F1 Grand Prix, Sakhir, Bahrain, 4-6th, April, 2008
Kimi Raikkonen tests the 2017 F1 tyres in Abu Dhabi [credit: Pirelli]
Kimi Raikkonen tests the 2017 F1 tyres in Abu Dhabi [credit: Pirelli]
Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, Pirelli 2017 tyre test [Credit: Pirelli]
27.11.2016 - Race, 2nd place Nico Rosberg (GER) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid and Champion 2016 and 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, 2nd place Nico Rosberg (GER) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid and Champion 2016, Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid race winner and 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, 2nd place Nico Rosberg (GER) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid and Champion 2016 and 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, 2nd place Nico Rosberg (GER) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid and Champion 2016 and 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, 2nd place Nico Rosberg (GER) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid and Champion 2016 and 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, Start of the race, Daniel Ricciardo (AUS) Red Bull Racing RB12 and Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H and Kimi Raikkonen (FIN) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, Marcus Ericsson (SUE) Sauber C34 and Fernando Alonso (ESP) McLaren Honda MP4-31
27.11.2016 - Race,Kimi Raikkonen (FIN) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H  leads Daniel Ricciardo (AUS) Red Bull Racing RB12
27.11.2016 - Race, Daniel Ricciardo (AUS) Red Bull Racing RB12 leads Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, Kimi Raikkonen (FIN) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H
27.11.2016 - Race, 2nd place Nico Rosberg (GER) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid and Champion 2016, Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Mercedes AMG F1 W07 Hybrid race winner and 3rd place Sebastian Vettel (GER) Scuderia Ferrari SF16-H

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Paul - Unregistered

October 17, 2008 10:22 PM

What Raikkonen says is true, but penalties in F1 used to be a rare occurence that were only dished out when the rules had clearly been broken. It happens practically every race weekend now, normally for incidents that 15 years ago wouldn''t have even raised an eyebrow.

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