Mercedes boss Toto Wolff says Formula 1’s proposed new power units for 2021 are ‘a completely new engine’ and haven’t been met positively by existing manufacturers.

The 2021 engine specification plans released yesterday by the sport’s governing body the FIA and the organisers fronted by F1 technical boss Ross Brawn aim to make them simpler and louder – by increasing the RPM while the MGU-H is dropped and the controlled electronics and energy store are set to be standardised.

Yesterday’s meeting in Paris saw a presentation of the potential new engine specifications by the FIA and while events in the meeting have been kept private, Wolff told the BBC the proposals didn’t go down well with any of the current engine manufacturers in F1.

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“This is their vision and proposal and we haven't accepted it,” Wolff said to the BBC. “The flaw of the concept is that it's a completely new engine and new investment.

“It portrays it in a way of this is how we're going forward and none of the current OEMs (car manufacturers) was particularly impressed."

While Wolff accepts costs and noise levels need to be tackled in the new regulations the wider changes to engine specifications means a huge cost hike for manufacturer due to the huge concept alterations from the existing rules.

“The new concept needs to tackle the deficit that has been outlined - development costs and noise level - and all that needs to be linked with a global view of F1. We haven't seen any of that."

Since the introduction of the 1.6-litre V6 turbo hybrid engines in F1 in 2014, Mercedes has dominated the sport having clinched four consecutive world drivers’ and constructors’ championships with Lewis Hamilton recently sealing the drivers' crown at the Mexican Grand Prix.

Looking at the wider changes expected to change F1 in 2021, Renault’s managing director Cyril Abiteboul told L’Equipe the initial plans give a strong start as negotiations and talks continue next week at the F1 Strategy Group meeting.

“It is a good starting point but we can leave it at that,” Abiteboul said. “It's not just about the new engine but about the new chassis regulations and how the money will be redistributed after 2020.”

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"“It is a good starting point but we can leave it at that,” Abiteboul said. “It's not just about the new engine but about the new chassis regulations and how the money will be redistributed after 2020.”

Seems like they want to get rid of Ferrari fee & Renault is also uncertain they will be at the top, if they were high up they'd want status quo.

Looks like posturing from the engine-makers. The concept seems like it could be met by the current engines with mods. Until the details of the engine "perscription" are finalized it is not possible to see if a totally new design will be required. one would suspect that the engine-makers are more concerned by the likelyhood of budget caps and the two year development window they may face. It's also hard to believe the engine-makers won't want to create new engines to gain competitive advantage!

whatever the new engine proposals will turn out to actually be like the present four manufacturers will have a huge advantage re the combustion technology and the hoped for likes of Cosworth/Illmor and Aston Martin/RBR/maclaren valve cover plastic stickers hopefulls have little chance of the old times returning and repeating themselves. 

F1 was a privateers sport until the big brands showed up starting in late 90s and killed the sport. F1 can survive and florish with a set of rules to make the sport attractive again just see how Nascar is so popular in America and MOTOGP worldwide. In the end F1 doesnt need to big brands and I hope take the mavarick approach and let them go.