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British GP - Friday press conference - Pt.2

28 June 2013

Team representatives: Graeme Lowdon (Marussia), Eric Boullier (Lotus), Christian Horner (Red Bull Racing), Ross Brawn (Mercedes) and Martin Whitmarsh (McLaren).


Questions from the floor


Q: (Ian Parkes – PA).
Question to Christian and Eric: if you two guys are squaring up to a tussle over Kimi Raikkonen, with the exception of money – bearing in mind he's already quite a wealthy guy – what do you think will be the attraction to either a) bring him to your team, Christian? or b) keep him at your team, Eric?

Christian Horner:
At the end of the day I guess it's going to be the equipment at their disposal. They're going to want to drive – any driver, any competitive driver – is going to want to be in the most competitive environment that he can be in. I guess that's the same for Kimi as it would be for any driver. But let's just be clear here, we're not just looking at Kimi Räikkönen, we have Daniel Ricciardo and Jean-Eric Vergne who are true contenders for that seat. We just need to take a bit of time to look at all of the options available to us.

Q:
Eric?

Eric Boullier:
I think the environment he has with us obviously suits him. I think he told this many times. As Christian says, he's a driver, a competitor, so he can see every year we keep improving the team performance and obviously we expect to keep going in this way and match at least Christian's team's performance as soon as possible. So, being part of the environment you can like and build around yourself is one of the nicest challenges for a driver.

Q: (Luc Domenjoz – Le Matin).
For Christian Horner. We heard what you say about Kimi Räikkönen and the two Toro Rosso drivers but what about Sébastien Buemi? We understand he makes a valuable job as a third driver but would you consider him for next year and if so what are his chances?

Christian Horner:
Sébastien has made a great contribution this year as third driver and doing development work in the simulator. He had a great run at Le Mans last weekend which was super to see – but he's not a contender for a race seat at Red Bull Racing. He's an important member of the team but our choice is more focussed on the current, active Formula One drivers.

Q: (Luke Smith – NBC Sports).
Question for Christian: are you looking for a driver to simply accommodate Sebastian Vettel or someone who can actively challenge and rival him?

Christian Horner:
We want the best driver that we can possibly get. Sebastian wants to be challenged, wants to be pushed and from our perspective there are two championships. There's a Drivers' World Championship and a Constructors' World Championship and you don't win a Constructors' Championship with one driver. So, from our perspective, we want to field the most competitive line-up that we can and do our very best to support both drivers as we always have done.

Q: (Bob McKenzie – Daily Express).
Sorry, this question comes up occasionally so you've probably got the stock answers but what do you think it does for the image of Formula One – particularly here, at the biggest Friday crowd anywhere in the world – to have them sitting around for ninety minutes watching virtually nothing? It just doesn't look good, does it?

Graeme Lowdon:
Well, it doesn't look great but equally I think it's not the easiest thing to solve. I think Formula One is getting much closer to the fans and I think that's a really good thing and there's a lot of initiatives that are being done through the sport, through the teams and to help in other ways, to try and get ourselves nearer and try and give the fans more to engage with. I don't know what the solution is, Bob, as far as livening up a session like that. It was quite difficult circumstances. It does just seem to happen at Silverstone a little bit more often so I really don't know what that solution is but I do think that in other areas teams really are doing quite a lot to engage the fans and make being a Formula One fan more interesting, more exciting and more rewarding.

Eric Boullier:
I can understand the question, the frustration for the fans but I do tend to... in other ways, the debate is coming back all the time, because if you look at Wimbledon it's the same, they stop the game when it's raining. Any other sport is the same at least, so if we don't run or the car does run there's a safety issue but there are many other issues and we are the first ones to ask our drivers for the cars to be on track when we can. We try to do our best to engage with the fans and to do whatever we can but we obviously can't be blamed if the car is not on the track when it's raining and there's too much water on the track.

Martin Whitmarsh:
Well, it's not good, clearly, and I think we've got to be conscious of that. It has been announced today, as some of you may know from the World Motor Sport Council that there's an extra set of dry tyres available which have to be consumed in the first half hour of the first practice session, so that's a clear step in dry conditions, where we've had circuits which have high levels of evolution and people have been reluctant to go out even in a dry session. In the wet, we've got to be very conscious. We're here at Silverstone, we have a finite number of tyres, so we have three set of wets and four of intermediate tyres and it's always possible that you need to use those and that being the case, you can't damage them or use them early in the weekend. So it's to do with the number of tyres and there's got to be a balance. You've got to be sensible about the number of tyres we can consume during the course of a race weekend. We've done something today in the sport about this sort of thing happening in a dry session. It will always be difficult when we have a wet first practice session.

Ross Brawn:
I think we've been proactive with the extra set of tyres that Martin mentioned. They've got to be used in the first part of first practice, so you will get cars running. So I think that's a good initiative. I think the difficulty is, quite frankly, that there's a fairly high risk in those conditions and if there's nothing to be gained, the teams tend to be conservative. If we think the race is going to be wet, we think qualifying is going to be wet, then we run. If we don't – and that's the forecast we have this weekend – then the objective is not as strong to run in those conditions. It does make it very difficult but we have to acknowledge that it's not the greatest show when that happens. Luckily the second session was pretty full and there was lots of running thereafter, but if it had been wet all day, then there wouldn't have been a lot of running.

Christian Horner:
I think it's a great shame for the fans that all the cars are sitting in the garage and they're sitting in the grandstands getting wet to see their drivers and teams that they want to see out there. From a team perspective, we want to be out there because you want to learn and we're limited on track testing as it is but unfortunately you can't fully predict the British summer. And it was a bit marginal, actually. We sent Sebastian out early on to have a look and he said it was right on the edge in terms of aquaplaning and with the limitation on parts and so on, we had to make a decision to say OK, we need to wait a bit later until the circuit conditions improve. It's not great. What the answer is I don't know. Wimbledon have got a roof; maybe Silverstone needs to invest in a roof. It might be a good way forward.

Q: (Mike Casey – Associated Press).
We heard from Martin on the rule changes; maybe we could hear from some of the other teams about the penalty system and in-season testing.

Ross Brawn:
I think the good thing about a penalty system is hopefully we will know exactly what we're dealing with. It will take away, to some degree some of the subjectivity that's crept into some of the penalties in the past. Obviously being given the reprimand of a penalty in the first place is still going to be a judgement call so I think that's something which will be helpful. Other rule changes are really mostly about tidying up the regulations on the technical side and the sporting side for next year. It's quite a different technical package next year, so there's been some tidying up of that. In terms of testing itself, I think it's quite an overhead for the teams to undertake that testing on a regular basis and we have to find a way of making it as cost-effective as we can, because what we don't want to go back to is having test cars and test teams and all the things that we got rid of a few years ago, because it does then bring a step change in costs. Obviously if we can carry out those tests with the crews that we have already and the cars we have already then it helps a great deal but we're already hearing of 21 races next year and 21 races along with four tests is going to be quite a strain on the system. I think the teams have to sit down and work out how to organise those tests to have the minimum financial impact.

Eric Boullier:
To be honest, I haven't got much to say because both Martin and Ross clearly... I have the same position more or less.

Christian Horner:
By and large I think they're good. I think that the aero restrictions make sense. I think the testing changes make sense. We've gone to eight days or four two day tests so we've got rid of promotional days and straight line running and so on to now create proper testing, arguably maybe slightly more expensive but it gives the opportunity for young drivers and test drivers to actually run at those events as well as your race drivers. I must admit I'm not a massive fan of the points system, I don't like the thought of points carrying from one season into the next and that sort of lingering over the driver. In our position, we would have preferred penalties within a season to be dealt with within a year but that's the way it is. But I think by and large the changes are good and positive. Certainly on the technical side and from a sporting side with the testing, they do make sense.

Q: (Mike Doodson – Auto Action).
Gentlemen, the sport is in a state of limbo at the moment because there's no Concorde Agreement as Graeme mentioned earlier. And it must be quite embarrassing that this situation is continuing. In any large commercial organisation, when a senior official manager was under threat of legal action, it would be normal for him to step down until that was settled, if only to allow the normal commercial conditions to continue. I wonder if you could comment on whether our commercial leader should step down from his position to allow you to have the serenity you need to continue your business?

Martin Whitmarsh:
Thank you! I think there's a certain degree of uncertainty created by not having Concorde Agreements but I think if at the moment the sport does rely upon Bernie to bring these things together, I think we probably have quite a lot of greater levels of uncertainty if Bernie were to step down so I think at the moment, if we're told again today that the FIA and the commercial rights holder are close - I think the word is imminent that they will sign a Concorde Agreement, it's an odd arrangement because at the moment, clearly, as Graeme has reflected, there are ten sets of bi-lateral agreements out there and they've got to be stitched together with a broader Concorde Agreement into which the teams haven't had that much input and that's probably going to be some uncomfortable pushing together, but hopefully we can do that but I strongly suspect that if we didn't have Bernie in the mix, that that would take a much longer time and it would be a more difficult process.

Christian Horner:
To be quite frank, Formula One is what it is because of Bernie Ecclestone, the way he's built the sport over the last 35 years, everything we see here is based on what he's done and achieved and I think that without him we'd be in a lot of trouble. I think that the deals he's still doing, the circuits and countries that he's still taking Formula One to is quite outstanding, and while he has the passion and enthusiasm to keep doing his job, I think it's in our interests he does it for as long as absolutely possible, because I think the day after he isn't there the sport is going to be a lot worse off. So whatever his situation is, I think it's entirely right that he does continue because I can't see there being a better person to do the role - that none of us fully understand what that role fully constitutes - than Bernie.

Ross Brawn:
I agree with what a lot of what Christian said, it is a fairly unique situation and the way the sport has evolved. We do have the bi-lateral agreements, commercial agreements with all teams apart from Graeme's which gives us the financial stability that we need. I think that the grey area is that with no Concorde Agreement there's no well-defined structure for agreeing new regulations and what's happening at the moment is the FIA is defaulting to the old system, but given it's not defined properly and it's not part of an agreement, it could be challenged. The World Motor Sport Council decisions have gone ahead today based on good faith and good spirit within the teams and I hope that continues, but of course we really do need a firmer and stronger structure around future regulations and how they are decided upon. There is a framework which has been broadly agreed but it's not strictly in place at the moment and I think that's something that we do need to work towards as soon as we can.

Q: (Gary Meenaghan – The National).
Christian, going back to the vacant seat you will soon have, if you chose to go for a driver that isn't currently racing with Toro Rosso, what does that say about your sister team and the success of your sister team, given its purpose is to blood stars of the future?

Christian Horner:
Well, the whole purpose of that team is obviously to give young drivers within the Red Bull Junior programme the opportunity, but there's no prerequisite that they have to end up in a Red Bull Racing seat. They have to earn that on merit. They have the opportunity, they're both there in the Toro Rosso on merit, through what they've achieved in the lower categories. They've both had excellent junior careers and they're both in a learning phase, as they've come into Formula One and both are exciting prospects for the future. The fundamental question is is one of them ready? That's something that we will have to look at and contemplate quite carefully but they certainly both merit their place in Formula One and Toro Rosso does an excellent job in developing those young drivers. Sebastian Vettel is obviously the most successful graduate from Toro Rosso and the current two drivers are both exciting prospects.

Q:
Final thought on that: what's your time frame?

Christian Horner:
Some time before Melbourne, I would have thought. No, I would have thought later in the summer. We're not going to let it drag on forever but we can take a bit of time to make sure we make the most informed decision that we can.


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