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Three drivers placed on probation

Mike Conway, Ryan Hunter-Reay and Alex Tagliani have all been placed under probation for the rest of the 2011 season, following recent on-track collisions.
The IndyCar organisers are seeking to bounce back from recent criticism about their handling of on-track infractions, by taking a more serious and pro-active line with penalties.

Three drivers have been placed under probation until December 31 following repeated on-track accidents during races so far this season, which requires the drivers to improve their driving and overtaking judgement calls, or face the imposition of more severe penalties.

Mike Conway has been put under probation after making contact with Ryan Briscoe at Toronto, and for causing an avoidable contact with Oriol Servia at Edmonton. Conway was penalised during both races at the time, serving a pit lane penalty after the race went green again.

Ryan Hunter-Reay was put on probation after making contact with Briscoe at Barber Motorsports Park during the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama in April, and for spinning pole sitter Takuma Sato during the most recent race at Edmonton, for he also received a drive-thru penalty on the afternoon.

And Alex Tagliani was similarly put under probation until the end of the season. In Tagliani's case, it was for his contact with Will Power that put the Penske driver out of the Toronto race, followed by his lunge down the inside at the start of the Edmonton race that ended up with him hitting the side of Graham Rahal's car, putting Rahal out of the race and leading to the Ganassi car spinning off and collecting Paul Tracy just moments later.

The probation ruling was made under IndyCar's Rule 9.3, which states that "a competitor must not initiate or attempt to initiate avoidable contact that results in the interruption of another competitor's lap time or track position." All three drivers may appeal the imposition of the probation, although it's not certain exactly what difference probation will actually mean in practice.

The move by IndyCar to "beef up" their policing of on-track infractions comes in the wake of criticism of the race officials headed by IndyCar president of competition Brian Barnhart for their handling of recent races, especially the crash-filled Toronto race. Many drivers have complained that the decisions have lacked consistency and that penalties have not been handed out when they should have been.

The most controversial incident occurred at Toronto when Dario Franchitti made a half-hearted move down the inside of turn 3 and tapped title rival into a spin that sent him to the back of the lead lap. Franchitti was not penalised for the incident, and Power railed against the lack of action by IndyCar in post races, calling Franchitti "a dirty racer" and declaring that he wasn't surprised that Franchitti was penalised because Dario never was.

"Some guys know they can break the rules and get away with it. It would be nice to see it more strict like it is in Formula 1," said Briscoe recently about the unhappiness that drivers were feeling. "We never really know how far we can take it."




Related Pictures

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A multi-car accident on lap 76 saw Alex Tagliani back right-side-up after being thrown onto his right-side, James Jakes spun and Danica Patrick left without a front wing. [Photo credit: LAT Photo USA for IndyCar Media]
Mike Conway in pit lane before claiming fourth place on the grid for Sunday`s race on the streets of Toronto. July 2011. [Picture credit: Jim Haines for IndyCar Media]
Ryan Hunter-Reay waits on pitlane prior to practice at Pocono Raceway (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay with an early pit stop during the Pocono INDYCAR 500 (Photo by: Bret Kelley for IndyCar Media)
Helio Castroneves leads Ryan Briscoe (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)
Mike Conway after making contact with the tyres in Race 1. (Photo by: Joe Skibinski for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay exits Turn 2 during practice for the Chevrolet Dual In Detroit (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)
Mike Conway on course during practice for the Chevrolet Dual in Detroit -- Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Helio Castroneves, driver of the #3 Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Team Penske Chevrolet IndyCar V6, races to a second-place finish Sunday, May 25, 2014, during the 98th running of the Indianapolis 500 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Castroneves finished just 0.0600 seconds behind race winner Ryan Hunter-Reay, just missing becoming only the fourth four-time winner of the race. (Photo by Ernie Masche/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Helio Castroneves, driver of the #3 Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Team Penske Chevrolet IndyCar V6, races to a second-place finish Sunday, May 25, 2014, during the 98th running of the Indianapolis 500 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Castroneves finished just 0.0600 seconds behind race winner Ryan Hunter-Reay, just missing becoming only the fourth four-time winner of the race. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Helio Castroneves, driver of the #3 Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Team Penske Chevrolet IndyCar V6, races to a second-place finish Sunday, May 25, 2014, during the 98th running of the Indianapolis 500 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Castroneves finished just 0.0600 seconds behind race winner Ryan Hunter-Reay, just missing becoming only the fourth four-time winner of the race. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Helio Castroneves, driver of the #3 Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Team Penske Chevrolet IndyCar V6, races to a second-place finish Sunday, May 25, 2014, during the 98th running of the Indianapolis 500 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Castroneves finished just 0.0600 seconds behind race winner Ryan Hunter-Reay, just missing becoming only the fourth four-time winner of the race. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Ryan Hunter-Reay and Helio Castroneves (Photo by: Bret Kelley for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay kisses the bricks (Photo by: Shawn Gritzmacher for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay wins the Indianapolis 500 (Photo by: Jim Haines for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay during his post-race preference (Photo by: Dana Garrett for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay celebrates his win (Photo by: Mike Young for IndyCar Media)
James Hinchcliffe and Ed Carpenter collision (Photo by: Mike Young for IndyCar Media)

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Maxx - Unregistered

August 03, 2011 5:55 PM

So, you let Helio Castroneves take out a half dozen other cars without penalty, and Dario Franchitti make some terrible moves, putting other cars out, but, no penalty for them. To penalize the mid-pack drivers who have no shot at a title is a cheap move. Until they have a race steward with the stones to make a call, whoever it's on, IndyCar will remain a joke.



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