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Push-to-pass change for Mid-Ohio

IndyCar has announced changes to its push-to-pass power boost system for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio, in an attempt to make it harder to use the system to defend.
The IZOD IndyCar Series push-to-pass power boost system is to be modified for this weekend's Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, to introduce a five second delay between the press and the power kicking in.

“After that five seconds, when the driver gets to full throttle or already is at full throttle, the overtake will come on. That's to stop from using it as a push to defend,” said Trevor Knowles, IndyCar's director of engine development. "You can push the button before you get to the braking zone and when you get on the throttle it will be on overtake."

The overtake button - which adds 1.5 pounds of turboboost and 200RPM to the engine for up to 20 seconds or as long as the car is going full throttle - was first used in the series in 2009 and reintroduced to the series this year at Toronto after being on hiatus since the end of 2011 while the new specification engines and new DW12 Dallara chassis were bedding in.

Drivers will have up to 100 seconds of push-to-pass for the entire 85-lap race at the 2.258-mile, 13-turn permanent road course. Other than the five second delay, there is no recharge time between activations.

While the return of push-to-pass for road and street courses has been generally welcomed as adding overtaking action to street races, IndyCar officials are keen to ensure that it can't be used as a defensive measure - as Helio Castroneves did to good effect over the final 16 laps of the previous race at Edmonton on his way to a win over Takuma Sato.

The use of push-to-pass use was included on the live timing and scoring feed and even featured in the TV coverage of the Edmonton race, allowing pit crews to radio the information direct to their drivers in real time and virtually 'remote control' the deployment of the power boost.

"I just told them to tell me when he uses push-to-pass, and I'll defend it," admitted Castroneves after the race. "It worked out very good."

The five second delay is intended to stop that from happening.

“If you're the car in front trying to defend, the TV won't show when the competitor [behind] has pushed it," explained Knowles. "It will only show when the overtake is active. If [the driver in front] responds, he has five seconds before his overtake cuts in."

Knowles said that the series was looking at further modifications to the system for the future to improve racing action: "We didn't want to introduce too many things at one time," he said.




Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Scott Dixon leads Ryan Briscoe on lap 1 of the Honda Indy 200 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course. August 2011. [Photo credit: Dan Helrigel for IndyCar Media]
The Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course venue sign. [Photo credit: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media]
Close-up of Will Power`s steering wheel. (Picture credit: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon, driver of the #9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet IndyCar V6, celebrates having the fastest qualifying time Saturday, August 1, 2015, winning the pole for Sunday`s Verizon IndyCar Series race at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Dixon set a track record of 1:04.5814/125.869 mph. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Scott Dixon, driver of the #9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet IndyCar V6, celebrates having the fastest qualifying time Saturday, August 1, 2015, winning the pole for Sunday`s Verizon IndyCar Series race at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Dixon set a track record of 1:04.5814/125.869 mph. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Scott Dixon, driver of the #9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet IndyCar V6, qualifies fastest Saturday, August 1, 2015, winning the pole for Sunday`s Verizon IndyCar Series race at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Dixon set a track record of 1:04.5814/125.869 mph. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Scott Dixon, driver of the #9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet IndyCar V6, qualifies fastest Saturday, August 1, 2015, winning the pole for Sunday`s Verizon IndyCar Series race at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Dixon set a track record of 1:04.5814/125.869 mph. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Scott Dixon affixes the Verizon P1 Award emblem following qualifications for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon wins the Verizon P1 Award for capturing the pole position for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon and the Target Chip Ganassi Racing team take a selfie picture following their pole position for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon affixes the Verizon P1 Award emblem to his Chevrolet after capturing the pole position for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon wins the Verizon P1 Award for capturing the pole position for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Luca Filippi streaks toward Turn 1 during practice for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: John Cote for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon enters Turn 1 during practice for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon heads towards Turn 12 during practice for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Bret Kelley for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon rolls through the Carousel (Turn 12) during practice for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Bret Kelley for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon enters the Turn 2 Keyhole turn during practice for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio -- Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media
Luca Filippi with a quick off heading into Turn 12 during practice for the Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Photo by: Bret Kelley for IndyCar Media)

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Terminator - Unregistered

August 02, 2012 7:44 PM

I don't see this change working on a circuit like Mid-Ohio. It has lots of corners one after other and two obvious overtaking spots, so the one front can guess when the other will use it and press the button 5 seconds earlier.

Thorborg - Unregistered

August 02, 2012 6:40 PM

Not bragging but I did comment on the original story where the return of push-to-pass was announced and pointed out that when it was previously used it didn't work very well as the defender used it too and this resulted in a stalemate. Kind of weird than an Armchair Joe like me can figure this out where as the Pro's at Indycar seem surprised that it happened. This latest change is practically useless too. Most circuits only have one or two viable overtaking points so the defender can surely predict when it will be used and also activate it whilst braking for the corner that leads to the passing straight.



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