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Barrichello weighing IndyCar future

Former F1 driver Rubens Barrichello is fast approaching the point of the season where he has to start considering his future in - or out - of the IZOD IndyCar Series in 2013.
Rubens Barrichello's exit from F1 and his switch to the IZOD IndyCar Series was one of the most sensational stories of the 2012 pre-season build-up; but 12 races into his US open wheel racing career, Barrichello appears to be disappointed with how his post-F1 career has gone so far.

In recent interviews with Auto Motor und Sport in Germany and SPEED TV in the US, Barrichello said that he still believed that there was a chance he could return to F1, having described the 2012 Grand Prix season as "sensational." (See separate story.)

However, Barrichello was quick to add that this didn't mean he wasn't taking his IndyCar racing seriously. "I am not racing in IndyCar as a last resort, I am competing because I love racing," he said. "I am happy that I can drive here and I do not see myself as a victim."

But there have clearly been frustrations related to his move to the US - some of them because of the inherent differences between F1 and IndyCar, while others have been more to do with the KV Racing Technology team with whom he has a one year deal in place. It seems changes may be coming, one way or another.

Barrichello singled out the heavier IndyCars less reliant on aerodynamics than their F1 counterparts, an emphasis on fuel conservation and the lack of tyre warmers and power steering for his problems adjusting to the new environment. Instead, IndyCar relies on classic mechanical set-up adjustments to dampers, springs and roll-bars to tweak performance, and has recently re-introduced a basic turbocharger overboost "push-to-pass" system instead of F1's hi-tech KERS and DRS technologies.

"In F1 there are lots of electronic toys, there is none here," Barrichello said, hinting that IndyCar technology was in a state more like that of F1 a decade ago. "There is nothing wrong, it is simply less money," he added, pointing out that an IndyCar operation could run on $5 million a year versus the $50 million required in F1.

Ironically, given his initial concerns over running on ovals, his best result to date has been seventh place at Iowa Speedway. He also finished in 11th place in his maiden Indianapolis 500 outing, and claimed tenth place on the Milwaukee Mile oval track.

"Strangely, I have my best results on ovals, and I tell you why," he said. "You need to have a smooth driving style to pick up points," he said, adding that this suited his temperament. Even so, he admitted that the whole thing had been "a whole new experience - in the beginning you're buzzing around just one thought in mind, just keep away from this wall!"

By contrast, Barrichello hasn't been enjoying the street and road circuits, most of which are so tight and bumpy that they would never have even been considered for F1 events when he was chair of the Grand Prix Drivers' Association. His season started well enough with three top ten finishes in the first four street races, but since then he's struggled to find anything like the set-up he needs for success. Meanwhile Tony Kanaan has gone from strength to strength, and now sits in seventh place in the drivers' championship - ten positions ahead of Barrichello.




Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Rubens Barrichello signs up for IndyCar with KV Racing - Sao Paulo press conference March 1 2012. [Picture Credit: KV Racing Technology/Twitter feed]
KV Racing Technology`s Rubens Barrichello during pre-season testing at Sebring. March 2012. [Photo Credit: Michael Levitt - LAT for IndyCar Media]
Rubens Barrichello (#8) during the 2012 IndyCar Indy 500 Rookie Orientation Program at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 10, 2012. (c) 2012 F. Peirce Williams (Photo Credit: INDYCAR/LAT USA)
Scott Dixon, driver of the #9 Degree Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet V6 IndyCar, raced to a sixth-place finish Saturday, June 27, 2015, in the Verizon IndyCar Series race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California. (Photo by Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Sage Karam, driver of the #8 Comfort Revolution/Big Machine Records Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet V6 IndyCar, races to a fifth-place finish Saturday, June 27, 2015, in the Verizon IndyCar Series race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California. (Photo by Perry Nelson/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Juan Pablo Montoya, driver of the #2 PPG Automotive Refinish Team Penske Chevrolet V-6 IndyCar, races to a fourth-place finish Saturday, June 27, 2015, in the Verizon IndyCar Series race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California. (Photo by Perry Nelson/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Tony Kanaan, driver of the #10 NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet IndyCar V6 races to a second-place finish Saturday, June 27, 2015, in the Verizon IndyCar Series race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California.  (Photo by Perry Nelson/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Marco Andretti, Tony Kanaan, and Graham Rahal go three-wide going into Turn 1 during the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal wins the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
The podium of Graham Rahal, Tony Kanaan, and Marco Andretti hoist their trophies on Victory Lane following the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
The podium of Graham Rahal, Tony Kanaan, and Marco Andretti hoist their trophies on Victory Lane following the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Richard Dowdy for IndyCar Media)
Graham Rahal drives past the wrecked car of Ryan Briscoe after winning the MAVTV 500 at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California on Saturday, June 27 2015. (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)

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Thorborg - Unregistered

August 17, 2012 5:46 PM

Sounds like Rubens heart is still in F1. The trouble is he wants F1 more than F1 wants him. Perhaps he is still homesick. I think he should try to put F1 out of his mind and accept it is over. I feel he is in danger of weakening his position when negotiating or attempting to sign contracts with Indycar teams. I don't think that giving the impression his heart and mind are somewhere else will help his chances... He needs to come out and say "I have no intention of ever returning to F1, I want to race Indycars".

Dylan - Unregistered

August 18, 2012 1:46 AM

@BOSSMAN1 F1 doesn't have those things on paper when you go as far as mapping the engine to deliver certain torque and power for each corner that's way beyond TC F1 is a very easy car to drive at 99& that extra 1% is very difficult to master but still there's so much electronics that the driver as we know is not that important in F1 no more.



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