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Dixon wins as Dario makes crucial error

"I apologized to Graham and I apologized to Chip, Briscoe and Charlie I will apologize to when I see them," said Dario. "I own up to the mistake and Chip is right to be critical. It was a stupid move, and I shouldn't have done it."

Given that this season has been dominated by controversy over decisions from race control, Motegi was no different: eyebrows were raised at the applied penalty which put Franchitti to the back of the lead lap rather than the usual drive-thru penalty once the track went green. Given that Franchitti was already pretty near the back anyway, the applied penalty did him little harm - whereas a drive-thru would have dropped him even further back in track position.

Once the race got back underway, Dario spent the rest of the race working his way up from the back, finding some cars easier to overtake - such as Hideki Mutoh on lap 36 - than others. Giorgio Pantano made it clear he wasn't going to make things easy when he cut off Dario's attempt to pass on the next lap, only to then drift off into the dirt and lose momentum which gave Dario the position a few minutes later anyway.

Franchitti was also helped by a third and final full course caution that came out on lap 58, when Sebastien Bourdais delivered a forceful hit on the rear left wheel of Ryan Hunter-Reay's #28 on the entry to turn 4. Hunter-Reay was sent off into the sandtrap where he was beached, and the caution came out to allow the crane to move into action.

Surprisingly, Bourdais received no penalty for the accident despite the superficial similarity to the earlier Franchitti/Briscoe collision. "The reason we deemed it a racing incident is because Bourdais made a mistake coming off of Turn 2," said race steward Al Unser Jr. "Ryan's choice to go on driver's right, and then didn't give him enough room going around Turn 3."

The restart proved eventful: the first attempt at taking the green was foiled by a strangely unprepared and out of position Will Power; the second attempt proved successful at going green, but then KV Racing Technology team mates Takuma Sato and EJ Viso made contact - leaving Viso spun off the track - while Ryan Briscoe also went off-road and Vitor Meira likewise ended up beached on the side of the track.

None of those were in a dangerous enough position to force a full course caution, and given that there were only a couple of laps remaining at this point, race control made the decision to handle it under local waved yellows instead and allow the race to end under green.

Helio Castroneves was seen to overtake JR Hildebrand for seventh place under one of these local waved yellows on the final lap, and was duly penalised for the transgression - which meant being put to the back of the lead lap in the final positions, leaving him mired in 22nd. He wasn't happy when he found out.

"I am very disappointed in the result and the decision to penalize us at the end," he said afterwards. "I have said it before: the decisions by Race Control have been very inconsistent, this season especially, and I think today was just another example. I am really upset about it and I think it is very unfortunate for the fans and my fellow drivers."

It was a sad end to Castroneves' day, which had also started with drama when he tried a move on Ryan Briscoe and Graham Rahal who were battling in front of him: that make it three-wide into turn 1 at the start, and Briscoe and Rahal ended up running deep which left Castroneves no where to go except into the sand trap, costing him a huge number of positions after he rally crossed back to the tarmac in 21st position.




Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Scott Dixon congratulates his crew as Ganassi celebrate victory in the final Indy Japan race at Motegi. [Photo credit: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media]
Helio Castroneves run wide off into the sand trap on the road course at Motegi. [Photo credit: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media]
Will Power and Scott Dixon go into turn 1 side-by-side at a restart at Motegi. [Photo credit: LAT Photo USA for IndyCar Media]
Scott Dixon takes the chequered flag at the end of the final Indy Japan to he held at Motegi. [Photo credit: Daniel Incandela for IndyCar Media]
Dario Franchitti and Ryan Briscoe clash at the first restart on the Motegi road course. [Photo credit: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media]
Scott Dixon celebrates in victory lane in Motegi. [Photo credit: LAT Photo USA for IndyCar Media]
Will Power and Carlos Munoz flank winner Mike Conway during their victory lap (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)
Scott Dixon rolls out of pitlane during the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)
Carlos Munoz, Mike Conway and Will Power celebrate on the podium after the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Carlos Munoz, Mike Conway and Will Power celebrate on the podium after the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay celebrates pole position in the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (Photo by: Chris Jones for IndyCar Media)
Charlie Kimball blows up (Photo by: Richard Dowdy for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay leads Sebastien Bourdais during the early stages of the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (Photo by: John Cote for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay leads James Hinchcliffe during the early stages of the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (Photo by: John Cote for IndyCar Media)
Mike Conway (centre), driver of the #20 Fuzzy’s Ultra Premium Vodka / Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet IndyCar V6, celebrates his victory with champagne Sunday, April 13, 2014 after winning the IndyCar Grand Prix of Long Beach in Long Beach, California. Will Power (right), driver of the #12 Verizon Team Penske Chevrolet IndyCar V6, finished second. (Photo Credit: Phillip Abbott/LAT for Chevy Racing)
Will Power on track (Photo by: John Cote for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay around the fountain turn during practice at Long Beach (Photo by: Chris Owens for IndyCar Media)
Ryan Hunter-Reay on course during practice at Long Beach (Photo by: Richard Dowdy for IndyCar Media)

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T - Unregistered

September 18, 2011 1:58 PM

Race was ruined by dreadful officiating - from the start where cars where not lined up correctly to the 'non' penalty for Darios incident. Helio demotion from 7th to 22nd is laughable and it will be interesting to see the stewards reaction to Helios call for Brian Barnhart to go (and his tweet that BB is a clown). Surely BB cannot continue with such poor decisions race after race.

Anjin - Unregistered

September 20, 2011 6:30 AM

Most unfortunate driver of the day must be Sato. JP's lunge up his inside in to the hairpin was more than optomistic, it was downright suicidal. Takuma then fought his way back from 13th up to 9th, and then took another two places at the final restart, only to find Viso parked across his path at turn two. He, and the legions of Japanese fans who turned out to support him, deserved better.



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