Q:
After last season with the Nissan, you've done the deal with JRM to drive the HPD in 2012. How excited are you about the year ahead?

David Brabham:
Very excited, obviously. It's kind of amazing when I think about because the HPD car is something I have involved in since 2007 with Highcroft, the car has my DNA in it and I have been very much part of it. Of course I was at Highcroft for Sebring last year and then they said that they didn't have the money to continue and all of a sudden it was a case of 'Gee, I have to go and find a job!'

I ended up driving for Sumo Power in GT1, which was a move away from what I had become used to with a new team and a new series. I was wondering where it was heading and twelve months down the road, I've now been joined by the car that I know so well. It is amazing how life takes you so it was a lovely surprise to hear that they wanted to move to P1 and do it with the car that I know.

Q:
Was it a coincidence that they have chosen the HPD or do you think your experience played a role in the decision?

David Brabham:
I'm pretty sure that I had an influence, whether that is consciously or unconsciously. Obviously I know the guys at Wirth Research and HPD very well and I know what they are capable of, so there is a connection there. When that all came about, it was a case of 'Right, let's get on with it - who are my team-mates?'

Peter Dumbreck is someone I have known for long time although I have never worked with him directly. I've seen him work with Sumo Power and JRM and am looking forward to working with him, and then there is Mr Chandhok who comes straight from F1 and will give the programme a great profile. He is a good driver and will be a great asset to the team. I'm very much looking forward to working with him and with the three of us, and that car, I'm confident that we will be very strong once the team understands what it needs to do in this type of racing.

Q:
Just how strong can you be given the potential we saw from the car at Sebring last year where it challenged the diesel cars?

David Brabham:
Obviously part of the reason JRM chose the car is that they know it is a fast car. Sebring was an amazing event for the car because it was very late and we only got there on the week of the race. We hit the track for an installation lap and I did a five or six lap run and we were bang on the pace. The car felt good and we hit a sweet spot with the track as conditions change quickly at Sebring. As the weekend went on, we were fast although we couldn't be sure how fast we were until the race.

Out of the box, it was quick and there was only one small issue with the car in practice. That was why we finished second as we had a good, consistent run. In reality, the diesels were a second and half quicker than us to be honest, which is to be expected with the rules and the fact we had a new car and didn't really understand the tyre. The car had more potential and I'm expecting it to be fast this year.

Q:
How attractive is it that you aren't going for an American Le Mans Series title or a Le Mans Series title this year - but a full-blown FIA World Endurance Championship title?

David Brabham:
When you put the tag 'FIA World Championship' it is a massive boost to a series and what you are trying to achieve. There is nothing against the other series as they are all great, but you have to just go out and win wherever you are. The stakes are higher this year and there are some great cars in the series so I have no doubt it will be a cracking year.

Q:
Is the one downside the fact that Petit Le Mans isn't on the schedule? Are you disappointed by that?

David Brabham:
I am. It has developed as a fantastic race and we have seen in the past few years how it is well supported and packed out with the teams. I don't think anyone would sit there and say 'That is a good decision'. I'm not involved in the decision making process, and I think people are saddened more than disappointed that we won't be there.

Q:
The team you worked with so closely with in recent years, Highcroft, will now be rivals at Le Mans where they will run the unique Deltawing machine. How interested are you as an outsider now looking in in how they get on with the project?

David Brabham:
Very much so. There was a possibility that I could have ended up driving the car if I hadn't done this deal as I know they wanted me to be involved and I was very interested.

As you know, I am very into the idea of the sport needing to change to become more efficient as the world has to change - we are killing resources as a planet. I've been part of the ALMS and seen that series evolve by pushing green technology, although we don't know what the answers are yet. Racing is a fantastic platform to try things and hopefully we will come out with a strategy to help. It will take time and manufacturers are keen on it, so it's an area that the sport has to cover.

Q:
You are only one Brabham, so what else is in store for the year ahead?

David Brabham:
There is my son Sam who did karting last year in Formula Kart Stars and also my nephew Matthew who has been racing in Australia for a few years and who has now headed over to America to compete in the Formula Ford 2000 Championship. With Sam, we are going to continue in karts as I still feel it is a good platform for him to learn even though he is know 17. I don't want him to go to cars too early and it puts down a good foundation for him..

Q:
...plus it gives you longer to save the money needed...

David Brabham:
Karting is expensive too! You can spend as much in karting as in low level cars - if not more. I'm very conscious that he needs experience before he goes to cars because once he does, he has to get on with it and get results. I'm not that interested in results this year and I don't have the expectations that he does. For me, it is all about putting in the blocks that will shape him for life.

Q:
How are your MSA programmes shaping up?

David Brabham:
Really good. Team UK has been developing for a number of years and keeps getting bigger and better. We work with drivers from racing and rallying, and now co-drivers as well. We have Nicky Grist who comes in and does some work with the navigators and also James Wozencroft to help out the rally guys as he is very experienced, particularly on the education side. There is then myself with the race guys so we try to develop a programme to make them more complete as all drivers want to be professional and make it to the top.

I look at it and say 'If I own a race team, I'm going to employ someone who is an asset to the team and who understands racing and how to get more out of the team and the people around him and who is the complete package'. All the other things outside driving, like how a driver works with the media and what their attitude is, makes a huge difference if you are going to survive in this world. I enjoy doing it and love developing these younger drivers coming through.