MotoGP » Bridgestone responds to asymmetric front suggestion


"On Sunday the riders proved that there are ways to ride this circuit at a competitive pace without incident"

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Chilimack

July 18, 2013 3:59 PM

Any turn taken too fast or on the wrong angle can cause a fall, riders must know their limits and ride whithin them, it's part of what separates outstanding riders from average riders, push too much, pay the price, simple as that...

nealio

July 18, 2013 8:17 PM

Sachsenring is a very odd track and the riders should know this. It's really up to the riders to find the edge of the envelope, isn't it? Especially in practice you would think that they would work up to speed and not just go balls to the wall from the 1st lap. Once up to speed they are familiar with the tire's imputs and can then figure out how much they can push the tire at the start of the race which is crucial. Maybe the Bridgestone's are very hard to 'read'? I've read many reports suggesting this is the case. The highsides in practice were evidence that this is true too.

Gilles

July 18, 2013 10:24 PM

@snoddy, Dani didn't fall at that corner so get your facts right. There are corners that are more challenging than others, so what's the solution? Go the same way as F1, sanitising the circuits? I don't think so. No crashes on Sunday and few in previous years prove there is nothing wrong with that corner. Challenging - yes, dangerous - no

therealDave

July 19, 2013 4:14 AM
Last Edited 276 days ago

Please, someone explain to me how pushing a bike beyond the limits of its tires, suspension and electronics is the fault of the track or any of the above?

Rider error doesnt seem to get a mention anymore these days. . .

It used to be you line up the corner, select the revs and gear then tip in and gradually accelorate (all based on the riders feel for what the tires and suspension are doing).

Now its sight the corner, select the right mappiing, and full throttle away (all pre determined by the computer with little room for changed condition of suspension or tire behaviour).

A lot more variables need to be 100% correct and accounted for 100% of the time now . . otherwise? ? ?

I really do feel a bit for the riders as they have less room for error than maybe in the past.

TalentFan

July 19, 2013 8:58 AM

@ the realDave

You've hit the nail on the head right there - my posts are on the same theme.

Rider error can only be attributed where it is something the rider has control over. Now the boffins have data on lean angle, G, throttle position, wheel speeds and more things than I could probably ever think of, & 'solutions' for the entire track is mapped into the bike.

The rider is increasingly becoming a damn brave passenger who has most of the decisions taken for him by the software geek who is safely stood in the Pit with his laptop whose input controls the safety and destiny of the pilot risking life and limb on track.

Most fans seem to consider this 'progress'. I consider it to be a corruption of what the sport is meant to be.

MotoMarc

September 12, 2013 4:20 PM

Agree with you Talentfan. Racing would be better without all the electronic nannies as the guy with most skill would win. That's why I chose to stick to bikes without all that electronic c-rap. Yes, I understand the argument for streetbikes to have TC/ABS, launch control, electronic suspension and every other electronic nonsense but as a motorcyclist I like knowing that it's me not some computer making the decision. I've had arguments with motorcycle rag editors on this subject as they feel help with safety and only enhance the riders ability but I don't agree. However, for the novice I can see how it may help save their bacon.

MotoMarc

September 12, 2013 4:21 PM

Agree with you Talentfan. Racing would be better without all the electronic nannies as the guy with most skill would win. That's why I chose to stick to bikes without all that electronic c-rap. Yes, I understand the argument for streetbikes to have TC/ABS, launch control, electronic suspension and every other electronic nonsense but as a motorcyclist I like knowing that it's me not some computer making the decision. I've had arguments with motorcycle rag editors on this subject as they feel help with safety and only enhance the riders ability but I don't agree. However, for the novice I can see how it may help save their bacon.

MotoMarc

September 12, 2013 4:21 PM

Agree with you Talentfan. Racing would be better without all the electronic nannies as the guy with most skill would win. That's why I chose to stick to bikes without all that electronic c-rap. Yes, I understand the argument for streetbikes to have TC/ABS, launch control, electronic suspension and every other electronic nonsense but as a motorcyclist I like knowing that it's me not some computer making the decision. I've had arguments with motorcycle rag editors on this subject as they feel help with safety and only enhance the riders ability but I don't agree. However, for the novice I can see how it may help save their bacon.

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