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Rossi, Stoner discuss tyre rule.

MotoGP World Championship leaders Casey Stoner and Valentino Rossi highlighted contrasting aspects of the new single-tyre rule, when asked to reflect on the first race of the all-Bridgestone era.

Stoner took a 7.7sec lights-to-flag victory over Rossi in the Qatar season opener on April 13, which was delayed by one night due to torrential rain at Losail.

“It is very difficult just with two tyre [compounds available],” said Rossi. “It requires another way to work on the bike, but sometimes [two compounds] is not enough.

“In Qatar, maybe for us it would have been better to race on Sunday, for the conditions of the track and temperature,” he continued. “We struggled more on Monday night. The condition of the asphalt and a higher temperature made a lot of difference.”

But Stoner pointed out that, even if the limited range of tyres provided are not ideal, any problems are now similar for everyone.

“It's nice knowing that everyone else is on the same tyres to be honest. You're quite sure of what everyone else is capable of,” said the Ducati Marlboro rider.

“If your tyres are running out in a certain period of the race, then everybody else is going to be in a similar position to a certain degree - their setting might mean they can last a little bit longer or the opposite - but you have a rough idea of what everybody is capable of.

“In Qatar we struggled a bit with the conditions, they were quite hard on the tyres compared to the test, and I think this circuit should be a bit easier on them,” added the Australian.

Round two of the 2009 season takes place at Motegi this weekend, a circuit where - unlike in Qatar - there has been no winter testing.



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Chad M

April 23, 2009 1:48 PM

I agree with Stoner. Everybody has access to the same compounds, so no excuses. I know Rossi doesn't make excuses, but he's not going to get special tires made overnight like he used to. Time to leave the skirts at home boys, it's not an easy championship and at the moment Casey is a man on a mission.

Steve G

April 23, 2009 9:28 PM

By request, Rossi ran the same tyres as Stoner and won the championship. Somehow, though, the conspiracy theorists believe that the rule was to benefit Ducati. It's clear to rational people that Michelin were struggling and Dorna wanted more bikes to be like Rossi's and be competitive against the Bridgestone teams. The only way the could see that happening was to put them all on the same rubber. And then there's this notion that Stoner was lying about the seriousness of his wrist injust. So he had a career-threatening operation precisely why? The excuses some people use to deny giving Stoner credit are just getting more desperate and bizarre.



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