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Rossi: We need to have limits in MotoGP

Record-breaking multiple MotoGP World Champion Valentino Rossi backs calls for a return to 1,000cc engines in the premier class - and stresses that man should count for more than machine in the end result
Legendary multiple MotoGP World Champion Valentino Rossi has revealed his vision for the future of the sport, contending that limits need to be imposed so that the focus of the competition returns to the best rider once more rather than simply who has the best bike at his disposal.

Rossi has already been outspoken and unequivocal in describing the reduction in engine capacity from 990cc to 800cc in 2007 as 'the biggest mistake the world championship has made in the last 15 years' [see separate story – click here], contending that the bikes are now less fun to ride and less spectacular for the fans as the dependency upon electronic gizmos has gone through the roof.

Now, the Urbino native – who has achieved title glory with every engine size and every regulations package in recent memory, in 125cc, 250cc, 500cc, 800cc and 990cc – argues that the onus needs to be placed back upon the skill of the rider rather than the quality of the equipment beneath him, and as such has come out in support of the proposed 1,000cc, four-cylinder route the series is evaluating for 2012 and beyond [see separate story – click here].

“I would return MotoGP to 1,000cc and I would remove 70 per cent of the electronics,” the Yamaha star opined in an interview with Italian TV chain Rai Sport. “That's a fair reduction, I'd say.

“Unfortunately, for motorised sports it's difficult; until recently there weren't many rules and everyone pushed to the maximum. We need to impose limits, but in an intelligent fashion.”



Related Pictures

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Rossi, Valencia MotoGP Race 2009
Valentino Rossi at 2014 Monza Rally (Pic: Cristiano Bami)
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Vinales, Suzuki engine blow-up, smoke, Jerez WSBK/MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2014

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dc - Unregistered

December 03, 2009 12:54 PM

OK, getting rid of 70% of the electronics is an interesting statement. As no-one outside of the factory is ever going to be FULLY aware of how much electronic trickery is managing the rideability of these bikes... what should go and what should stay?? Lose All forms of Traction Control Electronic clutches (back in control) Launch Control Anti wheelie GPS power maps / gimbals etc active suspension Keep Fuel & Ignition Mapping Electronic throttles Quickshifters Introduce - FIM Control ECU.



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