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Aoyama keen to capitalise on level playing field

Aoyama heads to Silverstone eager to build on his 13th position in the overall MotoGP standings.
Hiroshi Aoyama is targeting a return to the top ten at the British Grand Prix as he looks to capitalise on the level playing field of a brand new venue.

The Japanese rider has shown solid consistency in his first season in the premier class, the reigning 250cc champion scoring in each race so far, even if his best finish remains the tenth he achieved at the Qatar opener.

Nonetheless, with both himself and the Interwetten Honda team hampered by a lack of pre-event data when compared to their more experienced rivals, Aoyama believes Silverstone will give him the chance to perform better.

“Silverstone gives me the advantage that nobody has ever gained any experience here. For me until now all tracks have been new as it was the first time there with the MotoGP bike.

“This track is new for all of us. Nobody has any data on this track and we all start at Zero, not only the new teams and riders. Silverstone is a fast track, a very fast track and the set up of the bike is very important.

“We already did a good job with the settings in Mugello. I just hope I can transform this in Silverstone.”


Tagged as: aoyama

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focus - Unregistered

June 16, 2010 4:25 PM

@ gpfan "2003 is one of the best rookie packs imo." You forgot Makoto Tamada dude: He's washed up now but this man was one of the fastest riders on earth between 2001 & 2004 Two time race winner, pole sitter in MGP Three time race winner & pole sitter in WSBK Respect :)

focus - Unregistered

June 16, 2010 11:31 PM

So would've he won without bridges? I don't think so. Nonetheless Tamada was one of the very few riders able to have success with differents tyres. He's had wins with Dunlop in Superbikes, wins with bridgestones in mgp, & one podium with Michelin. He's been very disappointing with the French rubbers, but like you say "Tamada was fun to watch with high confidence". Yes, without this confidence Makoto wasn't special. I remember him the 1st time he led a race, that was for Mugello 04 against the Italian bunch. I was there... Jeez, he was nothing but supernaturel Let's face it: Sometimes, there was something very special between Makoto & the Bridgestones. I'll never forget him. chees



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