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History of the Dutch TT

Assen is the only venue that has hosted a motorcycle grand prix every year since the World Championship started in 1949.

Below is a selection of highlights and milestones from the 61 Dutch TT events that have taken place, since it became part of the world championship series.

The 2010 race (the 80th Dutch TT counting pre-world championship events) takes place on Saturday:

1949 – Held on the original 16.5 km long circuit. History was made by Nello Pagani, who won both the 500cc and 125cc races to become the first rider to win two races at a Grand Prix event.

1955 – This year saw a major revision of the circuit, which was reduced in length to 7.7km. There was a riders' protest during the 350cc race when more than a dozen riders pulled into the pits at the end of the first lap in protest at the lack of financial rewards for taking part in Grand Prix racing. As a result 13 riders were suspended from racing for six months.

1964 – Jim Redman became the first rider to win three Grand Prix races on the same day when he took the victories in the 125cc, 250cc and 350cc classes on his Honda.

1967 – Mike Hailwood (Honda) matched the feat of Redman by winning three GP races on the same day; this time in the 250cc, 350cc and 500cc classes.

1968 –Paul Lodewijkx, riding the Dutch built Jamathi, won the 50cc race to become the first Dutch rider to stand on the top step of the podium at his home Grand Prix.

1974 – American Kenny Roberts (Yamaha) made his grand prix debut in the 250cc race. He qualified on pole before finishing third in the race.

1975 – Barry Sheene (Suzuki) took his first victory in the 500cc class from Giacomo Agostini. The two riders were so close across the line that they were credited with the same time – the only occasion this has occurred in the premier-class.

1976 – Giacomo Agostini gave MV Agusta the last of their 76 victories in the 350cc class.

1977 – At his home Grand Prix, Wil Hartog riding a Suzuki became the first Dutch rider to win a 500cc Grand Prix.

1980 –Jack Middleburg, on his privateer Yamaha, took his first GP victory at his home grand prix. This was the last win in the class for a bike using an in-line 4-cylinder arrangement.




Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Edwards crashes within sight of victory, Hayden rejoins, Dutch MotoGP, 2006
Pedrosa, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Pedrosa, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Pedrosa, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Rossi, Redding, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP tests, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP tests, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP tests, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP tests, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP tests, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP tests, November 2016
Iannone, Marco Rigamonti Valencia MotoGP 2016
Iannone, Marco Rigamonti Valencia MotoGP 2016
Iannone, Marco Rigamonti Valencia MotoGP 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Rossi, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016
Pedrosa, Valencia MotoGP test, November 2016

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Jan Thiel - Unregistered

June 24, 2010 4:21 AM

The 1955 circuit was wonderful! I keep wondering why they destroy the circuit more each year. Once it was called 'the cathedral' Now it has become just another circuit like there are hundreds in the world

aeolus

June 23, 2010 2:39 PM

16.5km on bicycle tires in 1949! Those were the days. Today's heroes are amazing but they have it easy by comparison. On the other hand, a high side was not likely either back then.



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