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MotoGP claiming rule dropped

In addition to the Yamaha engine lease, Honda is building a 'Production' version of its RC213V prototype, while Ducati recently revealed it could offer this year's GP13 motorcycle for use with next year's full standard ECU, creating a further privateer option.

Official factory prototypes will also be forced to use the standard ECU hardware from 2014, but can continue developing their own software, for which they face a penalty of four litres less fuel per race and five - rather than twelve - engine changes per season.

CRTs also have a softer rear tyre available relative to the factory machines.

The class-leading Aprilia ART, based on the RSV4 Superbike, is the only complete CRT motorcycle currently on offer from a manufacturer. The other machines have been created by combining a bespoke racing chassis (FTR, Suter or PBM) with a modified Superbike engine (Honda, Kawasaki or BMW).

Although Aprilia's involvement in CRT caused initial controversy, the ART 'format' of an off-the-shelf production MotoGP bike looks to have provided a template for Honda's Production Racer.

Unlike the Yamaha engine lease, the privateer Honda will not feature pneumatic valves, or the RC213V's prized seamless-shift gearbox, allowing the Honda to be sold rather than leased.

Top CRT rider Aleix Espargaro (Aspar ART) has finished eighth at the last three events. The Spaniard beat all four Ducatis and one Yamaha at last Saturday's Assen round.




Tagged as: CRT

Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Edwards bike, Spanish MotoGP 2013
Rossi, Espargaro, Japanese MotoGP 2013
Aleix Espargaro, Lorenzo, Scassa, Japanese MotoGP 2013
Forward racing CRT, San Marino MotoGP Test 2013
Forward racing CRT, San Marino MotoGP Test 2013
Petrucci, CRT bike using WP Suspension, Misano MotoGP Test 2013
Petrucci, CRT bike using WP Suspension, Misano MotoGP Test 2013
Forward racing CRT, San Marino MotoGP Test 2013
Aleix Espargo`s Aprilia ART CRT,  San Marino MotoGP 2013
Aleix Espargo`s Aprilia ART CRT,  San Marino MotoGP 2013
Aprilia CRT engine, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Magneti Marelli sensors on Aprilia CRT engine, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Michael Laverty`s PBR CRT bike, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Headstock on Hernandez`s CRT bike, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Footpeg on Hernandez`s CRT bike, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Magneti Marelli sensors on Aprilia CRT engine, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Aprilia CRT engine, U.S. MotoGP 2013
Magneti Marelli ECU on Aprilia CRT engine, U.S. MotoGP 2013

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Jixr

July 02, 2013 3:10 PM

I don't see how the constant rule changing is either saving money or creating closer racing. Just when CRT racers were starting to get close, they now have to basically ditch their machines, pay who knows how much for a honda or yam ( or get paid to take a duc lol ) and start from ground zero. changing the rules to reduce cost only works if you stick with your rules for longer than two years.

jambop

July 02, 2013 3:37 PM

Never mind the CRT rot I'm off to by one of those fantastic Ducati GP13's absolute spanking bike that! Are Ducati for real? the bikes a pile of steaming this year why would it be any beret next year? It is being headed by CRT's in some races. Audi are going to have to step in here but it will be difficult for them, Ducati clearly do not know how to make a good race bike and Audi while great at making some sorts of race cars don't have a reputation for making race bikes. Now I await the Ducatist jumping in to tell me how wrong I am, but really am I ? They have won quite a number of races but they have not progressed their bikes at all ! There is something very wrong when in spite of hiring several riders with all the credentials to do well they have all failed. Stoner was a good rider for them but even he gave up because he knew the bike was not good enough and could eventually seriously injure him , wise man!



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