While Factory Yamaha riders Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo broke Honda's stranglehold on the 2014 MotoGP season with a one-two finish at Misano, Tech 3 team-mates Pol Espargaro and Bradley Smith were left just sixth and seventh.

"In terms of our pace in qualifying yesterday both me and Pol could run around the same area as Valentino or Jorge, and then for some reason they are able to have a lot better race pace than us," said Smith.

"We want to get to the bottom of and find out where we need to improve ourselves or our bike settings, because the gap is growing more and more. We are also finishing further and further behind the Ducatis now.

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"Me and Pol have exactly the same comments at the end of the race and pretty much rode the same lap times."

The Englishman added: "We can't stop the bike. We overload the front tyre too much if we push hard and try and turn into the corner, we repeatedly tuck the front and run wide I saved a lot of crashes today on my knee and elbow.

"We are not really sure where it's coming from, I think more from the rear of the bike than the front, but when you've just had a first and second from Valentino and Jorge there should be enough data to find out what's going on.

"We can't enter the corner as fast. We certainly can't ride how we need to and with a Yamaha style. We can't enter and carry any speed into the corner, because the front is still overloaded at that point. It then has a knock-on effect to how you carry speed through the middle of the corner, apply the throttle and pick up the bike.

"I don't know [what the difference in specification to the factory bikes is] and I know not everything can be passed down to us because we are a satellite team. But our material is very good and even if they can help us out by 25 percent it will make a difference because Pol finished 19s back and I was 23s. We need to learn from the race winning bikes."

While frustrated at his own result, Smith was full of praise for race winner Rossi.

"It's not as easy as it once was for him and the remarkable thing, especially from looking at data and the TV, is how much he is adapting his riding style and adapting the Yamaha philosophy I suppose.

"He's stopped trying to make the bike suit his style and made his style suit that. The infrastructure that he put around him for this year, at the racetrack and at his ranch, riding dirt track and learning some things from younger riders as well.

"The way he moves on the bike and the inputs from the throttle and brakes are a lot smoother. He is creeping on the bike now, rather than moving around. It's certainly working."