MotoGP is close to reaching a final agreement on the unifying 2016 technical regulations.

The sport has been split since the formation of a privateer 'Claiming Rule Team' category, in response to plummeting grid numbers, for 2012.

Essentially modified Superbikes, CRTs received benefits within the technical rules to reduce the gap to the official Factory prototypes. Those benefits continued when CRT was replaced by the more potent Open class this year, which now competes alongside two versions of the Factory class.

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It's a confusing arrangement, but will come to an end when a full control ECU system is made compulsory from 2016. The single set of rules will effectively be a compromise between the present three classes and are still under negotiation.

"There are many, many discussions going on with the MSMA [manufacturers' association] and then also Dorna," said Yamaha Racing managing director Lin Jarvis. "For sure there is progress in the discussions. Is there agreement? Probably not.

"For sure there are different opinions and the target is to arrive soon with one set of rules that each one of us will not be [completely] happy about - maybe some people will prefer more fuel, some more engines, some other things. But I think we need to compromise and arrive soon at a conclusion."

"If you don't have unanimous [agreement] in the MSMA, it's a majority opinion and then finally it can be decided by a third party," Jarvis explained.

Repsol Honda team manager Livio Suppo believes an agreement on the 2016 rules is "not so far away", with Ducati Corse sporting director Paolo Ciabatti emphasising that the differences are in terms of revised limits for the existing rules, rather than creating new regulations.

Ciabatti also pointed out that the wishes of the two new 2015 manufacturers must now be taken into account.

"There are ongoing discussions and from Monday [after the Valencia finale] there will be two new members of the MSMA with voting rights, Aprilia and Suzuki," Ciabatti said. "Obviously the newcomers to the championship will also have a say in what is the best solution for the future.

"I think that we all agree that there should be only one class from 2016 onwards and now it is more a question of how many litres, how many engines and that sort of discussion."

The main differences between the present MotoGP classes are in terms of ECU software, race fuel, rear tyre allocation, engine changes, in-season engine development and testing opportunities. These are summarised below:

Factory Option (Yamaha and Honda) ECU: Control ECU hardware, but own unique software. Race Fuel: 20 litres. Rear tyre allocation: Softest compound at each round is not available. Engine changes: 5 per season. Engine freeze: Yes. Engine development not allowed within the racing season. Private testing with race riders: Restricted. One nominated circuit for a maximum of 5 days during the season.

Factory Option with Concessions (Ducati, Suzuki, Aprilia)* ECU: Control ECU hardware, but own unique software. Race Fuel: 24 litres. Rear tyre allocation: Hardest compound at each round is not available. Engine changes: 12 per season. Engine freeze: No. Private testing with race riders: Unrestricted. Only limit is the Test Tyre allocation (120 tyres per rider per season, all classes).

Open class ECU: Full control ECU system, hardware and software. Race Fuel: 24 litres. Rear tyre allocation: Hardest compound at each round is not available. Engine changes: 12 per season. Engine freeze: No. Revised engine specifications can be introduced during the season. Private testing with race riders: Unrestricted. Only limit is the Test Tyre allocation (120 tyres per rider per season, all classes).

*Factory with Concessions is available to any manufacturer that did not win a race in 2013 (only Ducati) and any new manufacturer (Suzuki and Aprilia). Unlike the Open class, the four-litre race fuel advantage will be halved if a manufacturer achieves a race win, two second places or three podiums in dry conditions. If they claim three wins before the end of 2015, their riders will also lose the softer rear tyre allocation.