Andrea Dovizioso exercised the full potential of Ducati’s GP17 around Brno’s considerable uphill stretches to top MotoGP FP2 by close to four tenths of a second from impressive rookie Jonas Folger.

And while on the surface, Dani Pedrosa’s seventh fastest time may seem unremarkable, the 31-year old’s pace, along with that of team-mate Marc Marquez (tenth) and fellow Honda man Cal Crutchlow (eighth) will be a concern for their rivals.

With seven minutes left to play, the three Hondas sat well clear of the rest, with fourth fastest (at that point) Danilo Petrucci more than half a second off the quickest time. That was until the final five minutes, when a dash for a top ten spot necessitated a raft of fast, one-off laps.

Among those that jumped up the order late on, Folger was second, Danilo Petrucci third, Johann Zarco – fastest in the wet this morning – fourth and Hector Barbera fifth. Scott Redding’s sixth place made it five satellite machines in the top six places.

Following on from a morning of near incessant rain, the track still featured a plethora of wet patches when the 45-minute session got underway. The opening 20 minutes were made more or less redundant, as only a handful of riders ventured out.

That was until the session’s mid-way point, when the first three Hondas really opened it up. Their speed should come as no surprise, as all three men tested here mid-July at a private test, put on by Honda. Limited by the 5 days of testing rule, Crutchlow was on track one day, while the Repsol men had two.

With Pedrosa dropping to seventh in the closing minutes, and Crutchlow eighth, Aleix Espargaro made the all-important top ten with the ninth fastest time. Refusing to fit soft rubber late on, Marquez fell to tenth, while suffering another eye-opening front end moment on the entrance to turn 13. Needless to say, the reigning world champion stayed on.

There will be more consternation in the Movistar Yamaha camp, as riders Maverick Vinales (eleventh) and Valentino Rossi (14th) endured an unremarkable session, as the former tested the factory's new chassis, and the standard '17 design back-to-back. 

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Jorge Lorenzo was the first rider to debut Ducati’s radical new aerodynamic bodywork in public, with the new fairing as eye-catching as the ‘Hammerhead’ design, seen at the final preseason test in Qatar. The Majorcan ended the session 15th.

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Good to see Scott hit the ground running