After scoring 70 out of a possible 75 points in the three rounds prior to Silverstone, Marc Marquez came down to earth with a bump - or more precisely two bumps - during Friday practice for the British MotoGP.

Repsol Honda's reigning world champion was dramatically launched from his RC213V at the fast Becketts section early in the afternoon session, then later suffered a more sedate get-off on his spare bike.

In-between, Marquez set the fifth fastest lap time, 0.718s behind LCR Honda's Cal Crutchlow.

"It was a big crash this afternoon and it changed the plan of the entire practice and we were a little bit limited working with just one bike," said Marquez, who initially limped away after hitting his hand and shoulder.

"It was my mistake. I saw it was sunny here in Silverstone and we were able to push from the first lap and it was not like this! My tyre was still not at the correct temperature.

"I was angry at myself and not only because of the plan, but we are fighting for the championship and we need to control the risk. I needed to take care of the cold tyres; maybe I was too confident.

"My second bike had a totally different set-up and they were not able to change because it takes a lot of time. So my confidence was not good but at the same time the lap-times was coming. I was happy for this. When you are riding fast and you don't feel the limit then it is easy to crash.

"The second crash I can understand because I was pushing and this was normal.

"I like to go out again and go fast from the very beginning and this is what I did. [In this way] you forget the crash and I was pushing on the limit straightaway and even improving my times. In the end I crashed again, but I need to try and I need to forget.

"Tomorrow I believe we will make a small step with confidence and trying to understand the rear tyre."

After surprising by overcoming his previous acceleration issues - and fighting for victory until the final turn - in Austria, Marquez had to make a few changes for the fast and flowing Silverstone layout.

"I started with the same base and felt not so bad, but I felt we needed to change a few things for this racetrack which is completely different and from Austria to Misano it was more or less the same base.

"For this track both the team and I feel we need to change a few things. But I crashed on the first lap so we didn't have a chance to try so tomorrow we need to re-try."

Because of the damage to his number one bike, Marquez was unable to take part in the revised flag-to-flag bike-swap system at the end of FP2.

Regarding the bumpy surface, due to the braking loads from the F1 cars, Marquez stated: "in the Safety Commission we will ask again for it to be resurfaced because it is one of the worst of the calendar."

Marquez starts this weekend with a 16-point title lead over Ducati's Andrea Dovizioso, who was ninth fastest on Friday.

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It's a curious factor in Marquez's MotoGP career that he's had so many big crashes in practice and got away with them.

Sure is. I mean these guys have been not only racing, but also crashing, since they were just a small child. Best way to crash is also a skill they pick up over the years. The way they nonchalantly slide towards a gravel in a 120mph low-side is weird to watch sometimes. MM on the other hand, does walk away from the biggest off's I've seen in recent years; crashes where majority would've had a broken collarbone or something. However, with age, the "bounce" goes away and it starts to hurt more and more; MM is still in his mid 20's. I have none of the above, hence 1 high-side I'm limping with a dislocated ankle, broken ribs, and out of commission for 6 weeks.

He will still be there on the day. Marc (!) my words.

He's an amazing rider, when he crashes he crashes and that's only when he can't pick the machine up as it is about to crash, he certainly rides on the limit, entertaining.

Apparently, he has crashed more this season than any other rider. But mostly it has been in practice while finding/going over the limit.