Crash.Net User: DennisKwok

Comments rating: 228
Position in rating: 455

Show Comments on:

DennisKwok

August 28, 2013 8:53 PM
Last Edited 328 days ago

F1 » Michelin tempers F1 rumours


On the contrary Taipan, it was you, 107SS2009 and richard who instigated turning this thread 'sour' with comments of (and I quote): 107SS2009: "yes, you are coming around nicely." (extremely condesending and patronising) richard: "are you sure that you are not pcxmerc in disguise?" and not forgetting yourself.... "Richard, It could be PCXmerc's chemistry teacher! ask him about turbos!!" They were unable to answer my perfectly reasonable questions, so resorted to childish jibes. richard made his own bed when he made claims that so far, he has not been able to back up. He then further raises my suspicions when he doesn't understand why it is not valid making weight comparisons between different wheels, with different widths, different applications, different materials and different manufacturers. When somebody starts making claims that they are correct and that they have the necessary experience and expertise to back it up, then they should be prepared to come ujp with the goods.

DennisKwok

August 28, 2013 7:26 PM
Last Edited 328 days ago

F1 » Michelin tempers F1 rumours


107SS2009, you are mistaken if you think that I am 'coming around' to your way of thinking that large diameter wheels are stronger than smaller ones. Imagine this: you have two glass tubes, tube A and tube B and they both have a wall thickness of 1mm. Tube A has an internal diameter of 100mm and tube B has an internal diameter of 5mm. You are given the choice of squeezing one of the tubes between your finger and thumb with a gloved hand and if you succeed in crushing it, you will be given £100. So, for £100 which tube do you want to choose? Which is more likely to break when squeezed, tube A or tube B? As already stated, large load lugging vehicles use large wheels not for strength, but for lower rolling resistance, packaging considerations and to reduce surface pressure. To regain their strength, they have to use more material, hence why larger diamter wheels are exponentially heavier than their smaller counterparts.

DennisKwok

August 28, 2013 7:45 PM

F1 » Michelin tempers F1 rumours


richard, sorry but if you don't understand why your comparison isn't valid, then there is no point discussing anything with you any further. The fact that you can't explain what you meant by 'vulcanising failure' :D after being clearly asked to do so twice, speaks volumes and makes me question your claims of having been an engineer for years 'working with a major European tyre manufacture' (your words, not mine!). What exactly was your job title may I ask and what did it entail doing day to day?

DennisKwok

August 28, 2013 6:39 PM

F1 » Michelin tempers F1 rumours


richard, that is hardly scientific as you are comparing apples with pears, whereas I was not. I'm afraid your argument is not valid. I'm not sure where you got your figures from, but according to www . lotusf1team.com/the-e20-in-numbers.html, a Pirelli F1 front tyre weighs 10kg on it's own. I am still awaiting your explanation of what 'vulcanising failure' is too and what it has to do with the early season Pirelli tyre failures. I want you to share your insight with us. I find tyre technology facinating and who better to educate me than somebody who spent years working with a major European tyre manufacturer. However, you seem unwilling or simply unable to provide me with an answer as to what you wrote.

DennisKwok

August 28, 2013 1:00 PM

F1 » Michelin tempers F1 rumours


More than one way to skin a cat, of course you can have lots of smaller wheels instead of a few large ones, but I was generalising. It all depends on the application you want. Caterpillar 797s only make do with four very large wheels to keep their overall length reletively short, but they dwarf Super Kenworths. Speaking of the latter, don't they use a reletively small diameter wheel compared to their overall tyre height?

DennisKwok

August 28, 2013 12:31 PM

F1 » Michelin tempers F1 rumours


I'm not sure that we're singing from the same hymn-sheet here. All other things being equal, a larger diameter hoop cannot carry a larger vertical load than a small diameter hoop. A smaller diameter wheel will be stronger. Vehicles which carry large loads have to use very large diameter tyres for other considerations, such as reduced rolling resistance and surface pressure distribution. To offset the weakness of a larger diameter wheel, they make the wheels from steel as I'm sure you're aware.


Page 3 of 7
« 1 2 3 4 5 6 7  »

Although the administrators and moderators of this website will attempt to keep all objectionable comments off these pages, it is impossible for us to review all messages. All messages express the views of the poster, and neither Crash Media Group nor Crash.Net will be held responsible for the content of any message. We do not vouch for or warrant the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message, and are not responsible for the contents of any message. If you find a message objectionable, please contact us and inform us of the problem or use the [report] function next to the offending post. Any message that does not conform with the policy of this service can be edited or removed with immediate effect.

© 1999 - 2014 Crash Media Group

The total or partial reproduction of text, photographs or illustrations is not permitted in any form.