Crash.Net User: V4Poweeeer

Comments rating: 1751
Position in rating: 47

Show Comments on:

V4Poweeeer

June 25, 2014 8:13 AM

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


@knownothing I like the potential of hydrogen fuel cells and electric motorcycles. Electric motorcycles still require electricity which id normally obtained from coal fuelled gas turbines and isn't necessarily greener than running fossil fuels. The problem with Hydrogen fuel cells is seperating Hydrogen into a gas from water then storing it. Hydrogen being the smallest element is extremely difficult to keep stored as a gas in a container. Personally I'd love it if we went back to motorcycle grand prix racings roots and had 125, 250 and 500cc capacity. Have the 500cc having no restrictions on engine design other than four strokes. We don't need 1000cc bikes and manufacturers will make 500cc four stokes amazing if there is no restriction on engine design maybe we can see a Honda six or v6 now that would be cool. (Ok I might be a bit biased asthe rc166 was the most aamazing sounding motorcycle imo).

V4Poweeeer

June 25, 2014 7:18 PM
Last Edited 17 days ago

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


@Painless Your argument is throw a supercharger on for the sake of throwing a supercharger on. This whole supercharger equals linear power delivery is a fallacy if anything a supercharger will match the shape of the power/torque curves but will still shift the curves left or power/torque to lower rpms. The linear supercharger thing comes from two things engines that weren't designed with decent bottom to mid range power such as your ordinary inline four engine and comparison with turbos. Now in gp we don't have ordinary inline engines we have V4's and a crossplane crank big bang firing order Yamaha. These engines by design have linear power deliveries. Linear power delivery doesn't always mean perfect drive ability of a bike outof corners. It doesn't mean that the tyres won't spin and the front won't lift linear power delivery is not the holy grail its just part of the equation of having a good bike. A supercharger will just mean the riders will ride around at lower average rpm ..

V4Poweeeer

June 25, 2014 7:31 PM
Last Edited 17 days ago

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


... and electronics will be even more prevalent as it will be easier to get tail happy on the bike spinning the rear and doing wheelies in excess. The electronics issue isn't an engineering one per se but rather a political and ideological issue. You want to reduce the need for electronics reduce engine capacity a direction one Mr Jeremy Burgess felt was necessary to occur. If we have a death of rider in a solo accident then expect to see change then as humans more gets done out of reaction than it does from anticipation at times because the future is uncertain a d history does have a habit of repeating itself if nothing is changed. Nkw I'd like to see all classes reduce at some point 250 singles, 350 triples and 500cc open regs return Grand Prix racing classes to what they should have always been.

V4Poweeeer

June 26, 2014 2:26 AM

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


@Painless How do they tune the bike once you slap this supercharger on??? Thats right via a power commanderattached to the ecu. If you look at an R1's dyno chart the bike already has a linear power delivery the supercharger kits still do the exact thing I've been telling you shift the power and torque curves to the left producing more torque and power acrross the entire rev range. A linear power and torque curve by any means doesn't eliminate the need for electronics to tune your supercharger you still have to get out your laptop. The point in which the wheels spin will still depend on the change in torque when revs are increased their will still be a need to cut power no matter how linear the power delivery is.

V4Poweeeer

June 26, 2014 2:34 AM

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


When coming out of a corner the aim is to have a controllable power delivery and not all linear power deliveries are controllable. It's change in power/torque per rpm that determines if the power is controllable by the rider the steeper those curves the less controllable the bike will be and the more the need for electronics is to make the bike controllable. Well if you not aiming to shift power to lower rpms then why would you even consider it on a gp bike seriously you think the Yamaha M1 is lacking so much high mid to top end rev range the goal of a supercharger is to increase power all over the rev range shifting power and torque curves to the left meaning more power and and torque is produced at lower rpm.

V4Poweeeer

June 25, 2014 7:58 PM

MotoGP » Lorenzo pins hopes on Assen solutions


"they're a majority sport, we're a minority sport. car side spending makes us look like a WELFARE CASE. should really 'cause you to question what bike world beggars are on about...? they don't know from expensive." Ahhh boohoo my bike don't cost as much but my smile tells a different story :) At least tbe motorcycle crowd can conceptualise what the word fun means. In the F1 world fun people seem to think it can be summed up by deciphering the German (Duestsche) compound word on the front of Schumachers hat. F1 may have cash but the whole thing is very strile with no heart or soul no matter how many Italians roam that paddock.

V4Poweeeer

June 25, 2014 7:55 AM
Last Edited 17 days ago

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


@Painless Well a supercharger won't solve the linear power issue at all. If anything a supercharger will require more elctronics at lower rpm as the torque curves will be shifted lower in the rev range Ducati already has an engine with so much torque that the engine will still accelerate at low rpms with and the throttle closed. If electronics are the problem you are trying to get around then no a supercharger or smaller engine capacity won't eliminate desire for manufacturers thirst flr electronics. The only way to eliminate electronics is to go back to carbs with no ecu but thats a huge step backwards with tech.

V4Poweeeer

June 25, 2014 9:33 AM

MotoGP » Guy Coulon (Tech 3) - Q&A


@Painless I had a look at that article I actually read it a few years ago now one of the many gems that site produces. I'm assuming your suggesting superchargers as a method of eliminating the need for electronics am I correct??? Now this is the sort of topic I really like engine design :) Superchargers push the power and torque towards the lower end of the rev range. To much torque down low will increase wheelies which will increase the need for electronics to cut the ignition to the spark plugs. In which case the electrronics currently intervene at lower rpms to reduce power or force being applied to the wheels to reduce wheelies or wheelspins whichever one is affecting drive. That is why I don't see a superchargers reducing the need for electronics if anything I see it increasing the need.


Page 7 of 108
« 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  »

Although the administrators and moderators of this website will attempt to keep all objectionable comments off these pages, it is impossible for us to review all messages. All messages express the views of the poster, and neither Crash Media Group nor Crash.Net will be held responsible for the content of any message. We do not vouch for or warrant the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message, and are not responsible for the contents of any message. If you find a message objectionable, please contact us and inform us of the problem or use the [report] function next to the offending post. Any message that does not conform with the policy of this service can be edited or removed with immediate effect.

© 1999 - 2014 Crash Media Group

The total or partial reproduction of text, photographs or illustrations is not permitted in any form.