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Long expected a reduction in engine penalty.


Part-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Carl Long has spoken out about the punishment handed down to him following the discovery that an engine he submitted to scrutineers at the Sprint All-Star meeting was oversized.

While not denying that the engine broke NASCAR rules, Long insists that there was no deliberate intent to cheat. He had bought the engine from a reputable builder and was told that the heat generated when the engine blew up possibly could have caused the change in the size.

The engine blew during practice at Lowe's Motor Speedway and, in accordance with the regulations, handed the damaged unit over to NASCAR when replacing it. Series officials deemed that the engine was 0.17 cubic inches beyond the 358-cubic inch limit stipulated in the rules, and handed Long a twelve-week suspension from all NASCAR competition, docked him 200 points, and fined both him and crew chief Charles Swing $200,000 - the largest amount in NASCAR history.

Long, naturally, appealed the decision, but succeeded only in having the suspension limited to Sprint Cup competition, with the fine and loss of points remaining unchanged.

“I expected a reduction," Long admitted to Speed TV's Windtunnel with Dave Despain show, "I expected the suspension to be dropped, or at least [reduced to] the four weeks like Geoff Bodine and Junior Johnson had. I thought about a lot of things, but none of them seemed to happen, except that the infraction got rolled over to a Sprint Cup Series rule and that was the first time I'd seen that happen.”

Despain referred to Richard Petty winning 'with a huge motor at Charlotte' and getting 'only' a $35,000 fine, a record at the time, and the loss of 104 points, but Long pointed out that, not only was he not racing with the engine at the time, but that the discovery had not been made at a regular championship round.

"It was an All-Star Race, and in no other All-Star event in any sport does it affect the regular season," he claimed, "I asked them to change the rules - and that didn't work out too well, either.

"I think that, when Richard Petty won the race, he won the race when Bodine did what he did. They were in competition. This was in practice and anyone in the garage area knows my circumstances and why I'm there. The rules are written for what they are, but the bottom line is it always has 'at NASCAR's discretion'. There's a few things – 'hey, get this fixed before you come back through tech', or 'fix this before next week' - but perhaps I was wrong by expecting to get something out of it. A rule is a rule - that's what they said. That's the way it's got to be. There's no other game in town, so what do you do?”

On weekends when he's not racing, Long can typically be found in both the Sprint Cup and Nationwide garages, working for Front Row Motorsports, and spotting for the respective Nationwide and Sprint Cup teams. The narrowing of his suspension will at least allow him to ply his trade, albeit in a limited way.



Related Pictures

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Carl Long at Daytona [Pic credit: Getty for NASCAR]
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Stanley Toyota, leads the field to the green flag to start the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Duck Commander 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on April 9, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)
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Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Stanley Toyota, poses with the Coors Light Pole Award after qualifying for the pole position for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Duck Commander 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on April 8, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Jimmy John`s Chevrolet, beats Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Stanley Toyota, to the chequered flag to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Good Sam 500 at Phoenix International Raceway on March 13, 2016 in Avondale, Arizona.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser/Jimmy John`s Chevrolet, leads Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Stanley Toyota, during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Quicken Loans Race for Heroes 500 at Phoenix International Raceway on November 15, 2015 in Avondale, Arizona.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)
Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Chevrolet, serves a pass-through penalty for a restart violation during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Quicken Loans Race for Heroes 500 at Phoenix International Raceway on November 15, 2015 in Avondale, Arizona.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Sport Clips Toyota, races during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA Texas 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on November 8, 2015 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo Credit: Sarah Crabill/Getty Images)
Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, on the grid during qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Axalta `We Paint Winners` 400 at Pocono Raceway on June 5, 2015 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Stanley Toyota, drives through the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Bank of America 500 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on October 9, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 Interstate Batteries Toyota, Joey Logano, driver of the #22 Shell Pennzoil Ford, Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Chevrolet, and Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 ARRIS Toyota, pit during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA 400 at Dover International Speedway on October 4, 2015 in Dover, Delaware. (Photo Credit: Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Sport Clips Toyota, poses with the Coors Light Pole Award after qualifying for pole position for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 25, 2015 in Loudon, New Hampshire (Photo Credit: Brian Lawdermilk/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Sport Clips Toyota, practices for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 25, 2015 in Loudon, New Hampshire.  (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Sport Clips Toyota, stands in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 25, 2015 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)
(Back row L-R) Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet, Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 ARRIS Toyota, Paul Menard, driver of the #27 Libman/Menards Chevrolet, Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser/Jimmy John`s Chevrolet, Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 Nationwide Chevrolet, Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 3M Chevrolet, Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, (front row L-R) Jamie McMurray, driver of the #1 Cessna Chevrolet, Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Chevrolet, Joey Logano, driver of the #22 Shell Pennzoil Ford, Martin Truex Jr., driver of the #78 Furniture Row/Visser Precision Chevrolet, Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 M&M`s Crispy/American Heritage Chocolate Toyota, Clint Bowyer, driver of the #15 5-hour Energy Toyota, and Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe`s Chevrolet, pose for a photo after making the Chase for the Sprint Cup. (Photo Credit: Matt Sullivan/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 ARRIS Toyota, takes the chequered flag to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Bojangles` Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway on September 6, 2015 in Darlington, South Carolina. (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 ARRIS Toyota, celebrates with a backflip after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Bojangles` Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway on September 6, 2015 in Darlington, South Carolina. (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 ARRIS Toyota, celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Bojangles` Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway on September 6, 2015 in Darlington, South Carolina. (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)

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Ted Peterson - Unregistered

June 09, 2009 3:37 PM

I think NASCAR is being rediculous. some of the fines and penalties are rediculous. the whole idea of the car of tomorrow was to make the sport more "affordable" and "fair for everyone". when they hand down these huge fines and suspensions, that isnt very fair for these smaller teams. i think more penalties need to be handed to the engine builders. are the drivers and crew chiefs going to tear down and recheck all the engines handed to them by the engine builders? that would require them to have at least a partial engine shop which is what they are trying to avoid by sourcing the engines out. there should be an independant review commity for punishments.



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