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Edwards probation a message to Keselowski?

The Carl Edwards-Brad Keselowski spat may not be the only feud to simmer over NASCAR's week off.

When Carl Edwards took revenge on Brad Keselowski near the end of last Sunday's Sprint Cup race in Atlanta, it did more than just wreck Keselowski's #12 Dodge. It also gave pundits and fans of the sport a lot to talk about during the first open week in the schedule.

NASCAR may have quashed the feud between Edwards and Keselowski, but that doesn't mean there's not bad blood elsewhere in the garage. Though Denny Hamlin turned Keselowski in the 2009 Nationwide Series season finale at Homestead - and ostensibly settled the score from a week earlier in Phoenix - it's clear that he still bears animosity toward his rival.

Hamlin wrote on his Twitter account that he was dining out on Thursday night and, by coincidence, was seated two tables away from Keselowski, whom he referred to as 'Brad Crashalotski'. Keselowski apparently sent a bottle of wine to Hamlin's table, causing Hamlin to relent.

"Okay, okay... I'll take it back," Hamlin wrote, "He just bought us a bottle of wine."

For his part, Keselowski said the gesture won't affect the way he races Hamlin.

"Saw Denny at dinner last night," Keselowski wrote on his Twitter account on Friday morning, "Sent over a bottle of wine. Don't be confused. Still going to race him hard."

If there's a revenge play at Bristol, however, don't expect NASCAR to show the same degree of leniency toward the next offender that they showed to Edwards. As important as what Edwards did at Atlanta was who the protagonists were.

Rightly or wrongly, the general sentiment in the Cup garage was that Keselowski had it coming, based primarily on the aggression he showed last year. In letting Edwards take on the vigilante role for the entire garage, NASCAR, as much as anything else, was sending a pointed message to Keselowski.

Here's a guarantee, though. The next deliberate retaliatory act on the track - particularly if it's taken against a veteran who already has earned respect - won't be greeted with a three-race probation.

by Reid Spencer / Sporting News NASCAR Wire Service



Related Pictures

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No. 99 Aflac Ford - Carl Edwards [Pic credit: Getty for NASCAR]
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 ARRIS Toyota, Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Chevrolet, and Martin Truex Jr., driver of the #78 Furniture Row/Visser Precision Chevrolet, race three-wide at the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Axalta `We Paint Winners` 400 at Pocono Raceway on June 7, 2015 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Todd Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Cares Toyota, races the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FedEx 400 Benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover International Speedway on May 31, 2015 in Dover, Delaware. (Photo Credit: Photo by Todd Warshaw/Getty Images)
Cole Whitt, driver of the #35 Ford, leads Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Stanley Toyota, and Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe`s Pro Services Chevrolet, during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FedEx 400 Benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover International Speedway on May 31, 2015 in Dover, Delaware.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Daniel Shirey/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Cares Toyota, practices for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FedEx 400 Benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover International Speedway on May 30, 2015 in Dover, Delaware (Photo Credit: Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Cares Toyota, left, poses with Miss Coors Light Amanda Mertz and the Coors Light Pole Award after qualifying for the pole for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FedEx 400 Benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover International Speedway on May 29, 2015 in Dover, Delaware. (Photo Credit: Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Cares Toyota, left, poses with Miss Coors Light Amanda Mertz and the Coors Light Pole Award after qualifying for the pole for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FedEx 400 Benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover International Speedway on May 29, 2015 in Dover, Delaware. (Photo Credit: Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Subway Toyota, leads a pack of cars during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 24, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images)
Martin Truex Jr., driver of the #78 Furniture Row/Visser Precision Chevrolet, Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser/Jimmy John`s Chevrolet, and Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Office Toyota, lead the field into turn one during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 24, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Subway Toyota, wins the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 24, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Matt Sullivan/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Subway Toyota, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 24, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Subway Toyota, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 24, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #19 Subway Toyota, places the winner`s decal on his car after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 24, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo Credit: Sarah Crabill/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sprint All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 16, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sprint All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 16, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sprint All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 16, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo Credit: Photo by Rainier Ehrhardt/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, leads a pack of cars during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sprint All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 16, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina (Photo Credit: Photo by Nick Laham/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, takes the chequered flag as he crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sprint All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 16, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: Photo by Rainier Ehrhardt/NASCAR via Getty Images)

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Mike McInerney

March 13, 2010 8:58 PM

There will always be "tit for tat" in racing - it really means you have to be careful where to apply the blowtorch to your antagonist and to what degree!! Edwards would have been OK but the poorly thought out NASCAR imposed wing made the car take off in reverse direction of travel. Mike



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