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Texas to be the Spoiler Proving Ground

With the Spoiler Back Will More Exciting Racing Follow?

They are just pieces of sheet metal. About 4 inches high, 3/16ths of an inch thick, 64 inches long, straight across the top. But a lot of eyes will be trained on them this weekend at Texas Motor Speedway because a lot of hopes are being attached to them.

Spoilers—oddly named because many in and around NASCAR are praying they will be saviors—get the test that millions have been waiting for in Sunday's Samsung Mobile 500 Sprint Cup Series race.

Among those millions are 40-some drivers.

“I'm a little perplexed about it,” Jeff Burton said of racing on a 1.5-mile track for the first time—again—with a spoiler, “and really am looking forward to seeing what happens this weekend because I think it will be a great learning experience.”

Spoilers have been reintroduced to the Cup cars in hopes they will produce better racing—that is, racing with more passing, more side-by-side competition and more lead changes. They have replaced the rear wings, which were the signature physical feature of the Cars of Tomorrow.

Spoilers have been used in two tests on 1.5-mile tracks—Texas and Charlotte—and in the past three races. But tests are not races, and the past three races were at short tracks Bristol, Martinsville and Phoenix.

After each of the tests and races, drivers of the spoiler-clad cars were pulled aside and asked: Well?

The standard answer has been: Wait until race day at Texas. Spoilers are more important on bigger tracks because more grip is needed to provide stability at faster speeds.

“This will finally be the test, the real test that is, of the NASCAR-mandated change to the (rear) deck spoiler from the old wing configuration,” said Howard Comstock of Dodge Motorsports Engineering. “We've run the spoiler on the 95 mph Martinsville track, and we've run the spoiler on the 130 mph Phoenix track, but none of that will have prepared anybody for the effect we'll see on the 190 mph Texas Motor Speedway. It will be interesting.”

So, next week, NASCAR-types will be able to talk in certain terms about the return to the vertical blades and their effect on the quality of racing on the sport's most prevalent type of track—15 of the series' 36 races are on intermediate tracks (1.5- and 2-mile ovals).

But that did not stop competitors from offering up hopes and predictions about spoilers on speedways this week.

Burton was a high-hoper.

“The biggest thing I'm interested in is what happens when you get behind another car,” said Burton, a two-time winner at Texas. “There were times on Saturday night (at Phoenix) that I thought it was harder to pass with the spoiler. (Yet) we passed more cars than I ever remember passing there. ... So part of me says, 'Wow, it seemed like it was hard to pass.' But the evidence says I passed a tremendous amount of cars.”




Related Pictures

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Spoiler
Cole Custer, driver of the #00 Haas Automation Chevrolet, celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series UNOH 175 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 20, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Jared Wickerham/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Cole Custer, driver of the #00 Haas Automation Chevrolet, takes the chequered flag to win the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series UNOH 175 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 20, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire.  (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Cole Custer, driver of the #00 Haas Automation Chevrolet, celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series UNOH 175 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 20, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Sarah Glenn/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dale Earnhardt, Jr., driver of the #88 Diet Mountain Dew Chevrolet SS qualified for eleventh position September 19, 2014 for Sunday`s Chase Challenger 16 NASCAR Sprint Cup race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, New Hampshire. Earnhardt, Jr. is in the Chase which continues with the Challenger 16 for this and next week`s race. (Photo by Alan Marler/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe’s Chevrolet SS qualified for sixth position September 19, 2014 for Sunday`s Chase Challenger 16 NASCAR Sprint Cup race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, New Hampshire. Johnson is in the Chase which continues with the Challenger 16 for this and next week`s race. (Photo by Christa L Thomas/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Designate A Driver Chevrolet SS qualified for third position September 19, 2014 for Sunday`s Chase Challenger 16 NASCAR Sprint Cup race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, New Hampshire. Harvick is in the Chase which continues with the Challenger 16 for this and next week`s race. (Photo by Christa L Thomas/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Jamie McMurray, driver of the #1 Belkin/Wemo Chevrolet SS qualified for second position September 19, 2014 for Sunday`s Chase Challenger 16 NASCAR Sprint Cup race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo by Garry Eller/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #99 Aflac Ford, practices for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Chris Trotman/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, celebrates setting the pole position during qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kyle Larson, driver of the #42 Target Chevrolet, speaks at a press conference following practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Sarah Glenn/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 M&M`s Toyota, smiles at Clint Bowyer, driver of the #15 5-hour Energy Toyota, during qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire.  (Photo Credit: Jared Wickerham/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, practices for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Chris Trotman/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Designate a Driver Chevrolet, practices for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Jeff Zelevansky/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brian Vickers, driver of the #55 Aaron`s Dream Machine Toyota, stands in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Will Schneekloth/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 Diet Mountain Dew Chevrolet, prepares for practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 19, 2014 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo Credit: Jared Wickerham/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Marcos Ambrose in the Richard Petty Motorsport garage at Sonoma Raceway on June 20, 2014 (Photo Credit: Jonathan Ferrey/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, leads the field after a restart during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series MyAFibStory.com 400 at Chicagoland Speedway on September 14, 2014 in Joliet, Illinois. (Photo Credit: Nick Laham/Getty Images)

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