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Vickers drops in to Daytona from 5000ft

Brian Vickers finally achieved his dream of skydiving into Daytona International Speedway: planned for 2010, it was postponed after he was sidelined for a season with medical problems.
For most people, freefalling into the infield at Daytona International Speedway would be a terrifying feat in its own right. But for Red Bull driver Brian Vickers, it's simply a statement of intent to show that he's well and truly back to business as normal.

"This was supposed to happen last season, but since I wasn't able to, it feels great to know I'm healthy enough to jump this year," he said. "I think that's what increases the significance of it for me is that we had this planned last year ... To be able to come back and finish what we started was pretty special."

Vickers was sidelined early last year after doctors found serious blood clots in his left leg, and a heart condition that required surgery. He had to step down from his NASCAR driving for the rest of the 2010 season, and has been taking some time to ease himself back into stockcar racing his year.

The freefall dive into Daytona, then, is a statement asserting that things are finally back to normal and that he's fully back on the top of his game again. "I'm more excited than anything to skydive into Daytona," he said. "I've always wanted to skydive into a track."

The stunt was to help Daytona's PR build up to the Coke Zero 400 on July 2, as track officials are concerned that the spiralling cost of petrol will put fans off travelling all the day to the race.

"Speedways are pushing to promote events more than they ever have, and drivers are kicking in more, too," said the 27-year-old Vickers, who is unsurprisingly the first NASCAR driver in history to arrive at Daytona this way. "It's a group effort from everyone involved in the sport right now." Brian Keselowski and Ryan Newman are also scheduled to make pre-race publicity appearances to help out the Daytona ticket sales push between now and the race.

However, you strongly suspect that Vickers would do the jump anyway, even without any PR reason to justify it. "I've made about 75 jumps, always solo," he admitted, having been into skydiving since 2007. He'd been hoping to have his team mate Kasey Kahne along for the jump, but Kahne is still recovering from knee surgery.

"It's a rush. I mean, it's equal to driving a race car. It's the only thing I've ever found that's close to driving a race car. The adrenaline, the rush, the excitement. Everything about it," he told NASCAR.com.

Managing to pull off the pinpoint accuracy needed to land in an area like the Speedway is no mean feat, either. "It looked tiny, I can assure you ... And not only is it small but there's a lot of stuff to hit around it," he said. "Most drop zones are about that size but there's nothing around them. Here there's grandstands, buildings, light poles, towers, scoring towers, a lot of stuff."




Related Pictures

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Brian Vickers skydives in to Daytona International Speedway from 5000 feet to publicise the forthcoming Coke Zero 400 on July 2. Wednesday, June 1 2011. [Photo credit: Red Bull/Daytona International Speedway]
Brian Vickers skydives in to Daytona International Speedway from 5000 feet to publicise the forthcoming Coke Zero 400 on July 2. Wednesday, June 1 2011. [Photo credit: Red Bull/Daytona International Speedway]
Brian Vickers skydives in to Daytona International Speedway from 5000 feet to publicise the forthcoming Coke Zero 400 on July 2. Wednesday, June 1 2011. [Photo credit: Red Bull/Daytona International Speedway]
Brian Vickers skydives in to Daytona International Speedway from 5000 feet to publicise the forthcoming Coke Zero 400 on July 2. Wednesday, June 1 2011. [Photo credit: Red Bull/Daytona International Speedway]
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, walks through the garage area prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Scott Halleran/NASCARA via Getty Images)
Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 Interstate Batteries Toyota, and Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 National Guard Chevrolet, lead a group of cars during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe`s Patriotic Chevrolet, climbs from his car after being involved in an on track incident during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kyle Larson, driver of the #42 Target Chevrolet, is involved in an incident during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jerry Markland/NASCAR via Getty Images)
A large incident occurs in turn three during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Daniel Shirey/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kasey Kahne, driver of the #5 Hellmann`s Chevrolet, takes the chequered flag to win the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Scott Halleran/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kasey Kahne, driver of the #5 Hellmann`s Chevrolet, takes the chequered flag to win the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Streeter Lecka/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dakoda Armstrong, driver of the #43 Fresh from Florida Ford, and Trevor Bayne, driver of the #6 AdvoCare Ford, lead the field to start the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Streeter Lecka/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kasey Kahne, driver of the #5 Hellmann`s Chevrolet, celebrates in Victory Lane with Jared Fogle of Subway after winning the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brendan Gaughan, driver of the #62 South Point Chevrolet, spins out during the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Mike Ehrmann/NASCAR via Getty Images)
David Ragan, driver of the #98 Carroll Shelby Engine Ford, and Elliott Sadler, driver of the #11 SportClips Toyota, spin out during the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)

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