NASCAR »

Joe Gibbs Racing teams fined for parts violation

The three crew chiefs of the Joe Gibbs Racing teams of Denny Hamlin, Kyle Busch and Joey Logano have been handed large fines for trying to enter the Michigan race with unapproved oil pans.
NASCAR has fined the crew chiefs of all three Joe Gibbs Racing teams $50,000 after the #11 of Denny Hamlin, the #18 of Kyle Busch and the #20 of Joey Logano were presented for technical inspection with parts not previously approved by NASCAR.

The violation concerned new oil pans that had been added to all three cars, which were heavier than their regular parts and therefore could help lower the centre of the gravity of the cars when racing. There is no actual specific weight stipulation on oil pans in the rulebook, but NASCAR reserve the right to review and approve all parts on team cars before they are used at an event.

The parts were detected at Michigan International Speedway on Friday morning before practice, and all the non-approved parts were replaced for their regular equivalents prior to any on-track activity.

However, NASCAR were still unhappy that Joe Gibbs Racing had attempted to get the parts into the race without formally submitting them to officials for proper inspection and authentication.

As well as the fines, Mike Ford (crew chief for Hamlin), Dave Rogers (crew chief for Busch) and Greg Zipadelli (crew chief for Logano) were placed on NASCAR probation for the rest of the year.

Rogers had already been fined $25,000 the previous week for a different technical infringement when the #18 was found to be too low on its left front quarter after the Pocono race. Fortunately he was not put on probation for that violation or else the sanctions for this week's non-approved oil pans could have led to a far more serious penalty for him, possibly even a multiple race suspension that would serious affect Kyle Busch's season. As well as the fine for Rogers, Busch was docked six championship points and JGR six owners points last week.

In addition to the penalties levied against the crew chiefs over the irregular oil pans, the car chiefs of all three cars - Chris Gillin, Wesley Sherrill and Jason Shapiro - were also placed on probation until December 31, as was the JGR Senior Vice President of Racing Operations Jimmy Makar.

The NASCAR statement read:
All three of the Joe Gibbs Racing cars were found to be in violation of Sections 12-1 (actions detrimental to stock car racing); 12-4-J (any determination by NASCAR officials that the race equipment used in an event does not conform to NASCAR rules detailed in Section 20 of the NASCAR rule book, or has not been approved by NASCAR prior to the event); and 20-5.5.4A (oil pan, failure to submit component) of the 2011 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Rule Book.

Hamlin won Sunday's race at Michigan - his first victory in 2011 - while Kyle Busch came third for the second consecutive week despite all the various off-track distractions.



Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Kyle Busch`s crew chief Dave Rogers leans in the window of the #18 car. [Picture credit: Rusty Jarrett/Getty Images for NASCAR]
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, walks through the garage area prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Scott Halleran/NASCARA via Getty Images)
Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 Interstate Batteries Toyota, and Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 National Guard Chevrolet, lead a group of cars during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kyle Larson, driver of the #42 Target Chevrolet, is involved in an incident during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jerry Markland/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dakoda Armstrong, driver of the #43 Fresh from Florida Ford, and Trevor Bayne, driver of the #6 AdvoCare Ford, lead the field to start the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Streeter Lecka/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brendan Gaughan, driver of the #62 South Point Chevrolet, spins out during the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Mike Ehrmann/NASCAR via Getty Images)
David Ragan, driver of the #98 Carroll Shelby Engine Ford, and Elliott Sadler, driver of the #11 SportClips Toyota, spin out during the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 Powered by Coca-Cola at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
David Gilliland, driver of the #38 Love`s Travel Stops Ford, poses with Ms. Coors Light, Rachel Rupert, after winning the Coors Light Pole Award for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Sean Gardner/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe’s Patriotic Chevrolet SS, qualified fifth Friday, July 4, 2014 for Saturday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. Johnson is 2nd in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Bobby Labonte, driver of the #33 Thunder Coal Chevrolet SS, qualified fourth Friday, July 4, 2014 for Saturday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Landon Cassill, driver of the #40 Newtown Building Supplies Chevrolet SS, qualified third Friday, July 4, 2014 for Saturday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo by Christa L. Thomas/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Reed Sorenson, driver of the #36 Golden Corral Chevrolet SS, qualified second Friday, July 4, 2014 for Saturday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Cars on track during qualifying for the NASCAR Nationwide Series Subway Firecracker 250 at Daytona International Speedway on July 4, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, and Joey Logano, driver of the #22 Shell-Pennzoil Ford, lead the field at the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Quaker State 400 presented by Advance Auto Parts at Kentucky Speedway on June 28, 2014 in Sparta, Kentucky.  (Photo Credit: Rainier Ehrhardt/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Ford, pits during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Quaker State 400 presented by Advance Auto Parts at Kentucky Speedway on June 28, 2014 in Sparta, Kentucky. (Photo Credit: Matt Sullivan/NASCAR via Getty Images)

Join the conversation - Add your comment

Please login or register before adding your comments.

Although the administrators and moderators of this website will attempt to keep all objectionable comments off these pages, it is impossible for us to review all messages. All messages express the views of the poster, and neither Crash Media Group nor Crash.Net will be held responsible for the content of any message. We do not vouch for or warrant the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message, and are not responsible for the contents of any message. If you find a message objectionable, please contact us and inform us of the problem or use the [report] function next to the offending post. Any message that does not conform with the policy of this service can be edited or removed with immediate effect.


Ian Bennett

June 22, 2011 7:24 AM

What a bunch of nose in the air superiors some people are! NASCAR exists because a LOT of people want it to. I watch ALL types of car racing, Indy, F1, Nascar, Drag, saloon etc, and enjoy them all. Get a life! If you don't like it, don't watch it and don't comment on it. As to the fines, seems somewhat excessive! A good deterrent though!

Jesus - Unregistered

June 22, 2011 12:45 AM

Praise the lord!!!!! No one would cheat in any motorsport to gain an extra few tenths..... What would the lord all mighty say in this fair of fair type of racing????? Round and round in circles we go, were we stop, no one (with the right mind aside, from idiots would watch this rubbish) would be able to take a corner properly! Just ask Danica! Lol. Sorry couldn't help it. NASCAR, you open yourself up to a drilling.... And thats not for oil!!!!!!!



© 1999 - 2014 Crash Media Group

The total or partial reproduction of text, photographs or illustrations is not permitted in any form.