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Kyle Busch apologises to team and fans

Just a week previously, NASCAR seemed happy to allow Brian Vickers to continue racing despite his involvement in multiple cautions during the Martinsville race that culminated in his attempt to retaliate against Matt Kenseth for an earlier incident; Vickers succeeded only in wrecking himself but the resulting caution changed the outcome of the race. Vickers received no penalty or warning for any of the incidents.

Drivers felt that Busch's unpopularity with large sections of the sport's fanbase had either enabled or forced NASCAR into a more pro-active stance this week. The last time a Cup driver was parked for a race for on-track issues was Robby Gordon in 2007, after ignoring NASCAR orders during a Nationwide Series race in Montreal.

"I feel like NASCAR felt probably a little pressure from fans and things like that to make a decision," said Busch's Joe Gibbs Racing team mate Denny Hamlin. "There's not much different from what happened last week. There were a lot of incidents very, very similar that took guys out."

Championship leader Carl Edwards didn't want to get distracted from his own race by the incident, and sidestepped the question when asked about it: "I didn't hear anything that [NASCAR President] Mike Helton said, so I don't know the exact reason or anything like that," he said. "I haven't had a chance to talk to him, so I don't know yet."

Edwards' team owner Jack Roush said that he hoped the 'line' being tentatively drawn with Busch's suspension was about retaliating under cautions. "“Anybody that wrecks one of these cars or creates a problem after a caution or after a checkered flag really does so at their own peril,” he said. “I'm sure NASCAR will do something that's reasonable in the broad scheme of things.”

Meanwhile Kevin Harvick - who owned the #33 truck that Hornaday was driving on Friday - was still unhappy with Busch but insisted that as far as he was concerned "NASCAR has taken care of it," adding: "I wish my truck was still racing for the championship and still not totalled.

"I'm glad I was in my truck, and I had good people around me to make me understand that this situation was going to get handled and didn't make it worse than it already was.”

Harvick himself knows what it feels like to be on the wrong end of NASCAR disciplinary action, having been suspended for a Cup race for actions in a 2002 Truck race at Martinsville. "I guess you could call it a defining moment," he said of that incident. "Fortunately, I had sponsors that stuck around, and that was one of those moments where you know that you have to get your stuff together and realize that it's not just about you."




Related Pictures

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Michael McDowell sits in the #18 M&M`s Toyota after Kyle Busch was parked for the weekend prior to practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA Texas 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on Saturday in Fort Worth, Texas. [Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/Getty Images for NASCAR]
Team owner Joe Gibbs speaks to members of the media after Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 M&M`s Toyota, was parked for the weekend following an incident with Ron Hornaday Jr. in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race at Texas Motor Speedway. [Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/Getty Images for NASCAR]
NASCAR President Mike Helton speaks with the media at a press conference announcing that Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 M&M`s Toyota, will be suspended for the remainder of the race weekend during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA Texas 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on Saturday in Fort Worth, Texas. [Photo Credit: John Harrelson/Getty Images]
Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 M&M`s Toyota, enters the NASCAR hauler prior to practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA Texas 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on Saturday in Fort Worth, Texas. [Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/Getty Images for NASCAR]
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Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Jimmy Johns Chevrolet SS, qualified sixth Friday, August 15, 2014 for Sunday`s Pure Michigan 400 NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan. Harvick is 8th in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings. (Photo by Alan Marler/HHP for Chevy Racing)
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Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet, crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series GoBowling.com 400 at Pocono Raceway on August 3, 2014 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dale Earnhardt, Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet SS, captures the flag with his victory Sunday, August 3, 2014 after winning Sunday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
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Dale Earnhardt, Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory Sunday, August 3, 2014 after winning Sunday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series GoBowling.com 400 at Pocono Raceway on August 3, 2014 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania.  (Photo Credit: Tom Pennington/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dale Earnhardt, Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory Sunday, August 3, 2014 after winning Sunday`s Nascar Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet, celebrates in Victory Lane with a broom after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series GoBowling.com 400 at Pocono Raceway on August 3, 2014 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania. (Photo Credit: Tom Pennington/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the #88 Michael Baker International Chevrolet, celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series GoBowling.com 400 at Pocono Raceway on August 3, 2014 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania.  (Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images)

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bojan - Unregistered

November 06, 2011 12:06 PM

IMO there are just too many over aggressive, immature drivers in NASCAR for the "Boys, have at 'em" approach to work satisfactorily. If NASCAR is to be taken seriously, driving standards and etiquette need to be improved big time. Of course, it's always possible it isn't meant to be taken seriously?

karamozov - Unregistered

November 07, 2011 3:32 AM

Case and point. Nascar is about entertainment, it's not really about racing. There may have been a time when Nascar was about seeing which "stock" car was fastest around an oval, but those days are long gone. I'm an American, and I can say that while many Americans DO see the through the joke that is Nascar, many others buy into it--just like they buy into big time wrestling. I'm not saying that all Nascar drivers, or all wrestlers, are fakes, but their sports are generally fake. Crash shouldn't even carry news about Nascar--not on the same site as F1, MotoGP, WSBK and WRC, anyway.



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