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'Secret fine' for Keselowski over EFI comments

Media sources say that Penske driver Brad Keselowski has been handed one of NASCAR's notorious 'secret' fines, after speaking out against the introduction of fuel injection.
Brad Keselowski has been fined for criticising NASCAR's move to electronic fuel injection (EFI) in a recent newspaper interview, according to several sources contacted by The Associated Press.

According to the sources, Keselowski was fined $25,000. The fine has not been publicly announced, and neither Keselowski nor NASCAR would either confirm or deny the report.

Instead, NASCAR spokesman Kerry Tharp told the AP that: "We did talk to Brad following his recent comments that were highly critical of the series moving to electronic fuel injection next season. We made it clear to him that these kind of comments are detrimental to the sport, and we handled it accordingly with him."

Keselowski made his comments last week during an appearance at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. "It has less throttle response, and it's harder to get to start (because) it takes a computer to start the damn thing," he is reported as telling the USA Today newspaper. "It's a pain in the ass. I don't see where fans get anything from it," he said, adding that the system being introduced was already 35-years-old and far removed from modern day fuel injection systems.

"I'm not a big fan of it at all. Carburetor technology is 50 years old but is very simple. The benefit of a carburetor is that it's very, very easy to police. That's why NASCAR stuck with that," he had added. "They've been pressured into switching it through the green initiatives. In reality it's no more efficient than what we have, and it costs a lot more."

While unpopular with fans who want transparency in the sport and for drivers to be able to speak their mind, secret fines are not uncommon in NASCAR - although by definition, it's hard to know just how many have been handed out by the sanctioning body.

Ryan Newman was reportedly fined $50,000 earlier this year for allegedly throwing a punch at Juan Pablo Montoya in the NASCAR hauler at Darlington in June, during an unsuccessful private meeting between the two drivers and officials to resolve an ongoing feud.

Newman is said to have previously been handed a fine in 2010 for comments criticising the style of racing on superspeedways, in which he had said: "Racing for a championship shouldn't be a lottery ... [Talladega] is not about someone's car handling or motor being better. The cars might as well all be kit cars for these two races."

And Denny Hamlin revealed that he got a slap on the wrists for critical comments that he made in posts on Twitter, in which he implied that NASCAR may have intentionally influenced the outcome of races by throwing a debris caution at key moments.

"I understand this is show business," Hamlin had said in his original 2010 comments. "There is always debris that they could throw a legitimate caution for, but I think that sometimes they just kinda let it go when maybe things are getting mixed up, and other times, when things are spread out, let's tighten it back up. You don't have to be so smart to realise that these things are just by chance."

As with the ongoing debate about 'Boys Have At It', it seems that drivers are still struggling to identify a consistent line that they are not supposed to cross.



Related Pictures

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Brad Keselowski in his team garage at Kentucky Speedway. [Picture Credit: Jason Smith/Getty Images for NASCAR]
AJ Allmendinger testing one of the Ford cars using the new electronic fuel injection systems that will be introduced in NASCAR for the start of the 2012 season. [Picture credit: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images for NASCAR]
Brad Keselowski in his car. [Picture Credit: Todd Warshaw/Getty Images for NASCAR]
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet, and Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet, lead a pack of cars during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 16, 2014 in Homestead, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, practices for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 14, 2014 in Homestead, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet, passes Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, to take the lead and win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 16, 2014 in Homestead, Florida. (Photo Credit: Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory and the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Championship Sunday, November 16, 2014 winning the final NASCAR Sprint Cup race of the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Homestead, Florida. Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet SS finishes 2nd. (Photo by Harold Hinson/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory and the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Championship Sunday, November 16, 2014 winning the final NASCAR Sprint Cup race of the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Homestead, Florida. Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet SS finishes 2nd. (Photo by Harold Hinson/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory and the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Championship Sunday, November 16, 2014 winning the final NASCAR Sprint Cup race of the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Homestead, Florida. Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet SS finishes 2nd. (Photo by Harold Hinson/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory and the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Championship Sunday, November 16, 2014 winning the final NASCAR Sprint Cup race of the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Homestead, Florida. Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet SS finishes 2nd. (Photo by Christa L Thomas/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet SS, celebrates his victory and the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Championship Sunday, November 16, 2014 winning the final NASCAR Sprint Cup race of the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Homestead, Florida. Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet SS finishes 2nd. (Photo by Garry Eller/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet, Miss Sprint Cup Kim Coon, Joey Logano, driver of the #22 Shell-Pennzoil Ford, and Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Budweiser Chevrolet, pose for a photo prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 16, 2014 in Homestead, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #22 Hertz Ford, poses with the Coors Light Pole Award after qualifying for pole position for the NASCAR Nationwide Series Ford EcoBoost 300 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 15, 2014 in Homestead, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/Getty Images)
Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet SS, who is in the Championship Four final phase of the Chase, qualified for 21st position Friday, November 14, 2014 for Sunday`s final NASCAR Sprint Cup race of the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Homestead, Florida. Newman is 3rd in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings.(Photo by Harold Hinson/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Ryan Blaney on track during Nationwide practice (Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Ryan Blaney drives the #29 Cooper Standard Ford during practice for the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Ford EcoBoost 200 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 13, 2014 in Homestead, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jonathan Ferrey/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Freight Toyota, climbs into his car in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Goody`s Headache Relief Shot 500 at Martinsville Speedway on October 24, 2014 in Martinsville, Virginia. (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)
Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Caterpillar Chevrolet, speaks during a press conference prior to practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Quicken Loans Race for Heroes 500 at Phoenix International Raceway on November 7, 2014 in Avondale, Arizona.  (Photo Credit: Sean Gardner/NASCAR via Getty Images)

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Ray Watson - Unregistered

November 20, 2011 6:49 AM

NASCAR is a show, it has nothing to do with Auto racing (Motor racing) any more. It is a spectacle for the paying public who have very little knowledge of the technical aspects of the "original" motorcar. And they are now just Kit Cars, built to a design. There is nothing "stock" on them anymore. Gone are the days of real racers, Richard Petty, Cale Yarborough,Dave Pearson (?),Buddy Baker. Those were real cars and real racers. Australian V8s are the same, just look like the taxi on the road.



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