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Series may axe inter-team communications

NASCAR is reportedly planning to ban direct radio communications between teams during races, in an effort to tackle the growing issue of two-car drafting.
Reports this week have suggested that NASCAR is to ban radio communications between different teams during a race, in an attempt to address growing dissatisfaction with two-car drafting at restrictor plate events.

The ability for drivers to call each other up directly and co-ordinate their runs and their drafting strategy has been seen as a growing problem with racing at superspeedways at Daytona and Talladega in particular, which have become more a test of diplomacy than of racing skills in 2011.

Drivers have been able to talk directly with up to 20 others under the current system, but new guidelines expected to be unveiled in time for the start of the 2012 season at Daytona would mean that drivers, crew chiefs and spotters would only be able to speak to others within their own team.

NASCAR is also considering further changes to restrictor plate specifications and engine cooling, which would also work against extended periods of two-car drafting during a race.

Fans have been critical of the the growing practice of two-car drafting in races, and several drivers - including Dale Earnhardt Jr. - have spoken out about the issue.


Tagged as: Daytona , Talladega , drafting

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Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
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