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Hamlin fumes over $25,000 fine for Gen 6 remarks

However, he had gone on to say it was down to the teams to get over the teething problems with the new car. "The teams hadn't figured out how to get the aero balance right - right now, you just run single-file and you cannot get around the guy in front of you," he had said. "You would have placed me in 20th-place with 30 to go, I would have stayed there, I wouldn't have moved up. It's just one of those things where track position is everything."

NASCAR spokesman Kerry Tharp said such talk went beyond the limits of what drivers are permitted to say in criticism of the series.

"You can voice your opinion about a lot of things about this sport, and we feel like we give our competitors a great deal of leeway when it comes to that, [but] denigrating the racing is an area we're going to have a reaction to," he told reporters.

"The main area of focus here we take exception to is the product, the racing," he added. "That's our brand, that's the drivers' brand, that's the sport's brand and that's an area we feel very strongly about."

“We give them quite a bit of latitude, but you can't slam the racing,” echoed NASCAR vice president of competition Robin Pemberton. “You can't slam the product. That's where it crosses a line.

“You're making a mistake if you comment on the worst or the greatest racing ever," Pemberton had added, pointing out that it was still very early days for the new Generation 6 car. "The first part of the season, we run on so many different racetracks, and we're so busy. ... Positive or negative, you cannot read too much into any of this stuff."

But the concern is that the fine imposed on Hamlin this week may have a chilling effect on what drivers will and won't say to the media at events in future, as Hamlin himself was quick to point out.

“I'm not going to say anything for the rest of the year, as long as it relates to competition,” he said. “I mean, you can ask me how my daughter is, talk to me after wins about what have you, but as long as it relates to competition, I'm out from here on out.

"The down part is I feel like I've been a pretty good spokesman for them," he added. "Being positive when things aren't always positive. They just lost one small spokesman today, that's all."

Hamlin later issued a short formal statement about the situation.

"The short of the long of it is I believe I was severely disrespected by NASCAR by getting fined. I believe that the simple fact of us not even having a conversation about this issue before I was hit with a fine has something to say about our relationship," he said.




Related Pictures

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Robin Pemberton, NASCAR Vice President of Competition, speaks with the media during NASCAR Sprint Cup Series testing at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on March 7, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Office Toyota stands in the garage area during NASCAR Sprint Cup Series testing at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on March 7, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
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Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe`s Patriotic Chevrolet, climbs from his car after being involved in an on track incident during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images)
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Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Aric Almirola, driver of the #43 United States Air Force Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coke Zero 400 after the race was called for weather at Daytona International Speedway on July 6, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  (Photo Credit: Chris Graythen/NASCAR via Getty Images)
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Kyle Busch, driver of the #51 Dollar General Toyota, crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series UNOH 225 at Kentucky Speedway on June 26, 2014 in Sparta, Kentucky. (Photo Credit: Robert Laberge/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kyle Busch, driver of the #51 Dollar General Toyota, celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series UNOH 225 at Kentucky Speedway on June 26, 2014 in Sparta, Kentucky.  (Photo Credit: Rainier Ehrhardt/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Carl Edwards, driver of the #99 Aflac Ford, puts a winner sticker on his car as he celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma Raceway on June 22, 2014 in Sonoma, California.  (Photo Credit: Jonathan Ferrey/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, crashes into a tire barrier during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma Raceway on June 22, 2014 in Sonoma, California.  (Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images)
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ottawanker - Unregistered

March 08, 2013 3:28 PM

I think NASCAR would be happier if their were no drivers in the sport... Then they could just sell 3 hours of ads, not have to bother showing any racing or bother trying to control their drivers. Pure profit.



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