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Big win for Joe Gibbs Racing in appeal hearing

As part of the original penalty, Kenseth's race win at Kansas wouldn't have counted towards a 'most wins wildcard' in the event he needed one to make the post-season Chase; he wouldn't have got the three point credit in the Chase for the win; and the pole wouldn't have counted toward making the 2014 Sprint Unlimited field, although that was made academic by his winning a consecutive pole in the next race. All those sanctions have been set aside by the appeals panel.

Before today's hearing, 70 per cent of the cases previously brought before NASCAR's appeals panel had been upheld.

NASCAR made it clear that they were not happy with losing this week's ruling: "You're not going to agree with everything, and today is one we disagree with," said spokesman Kerry Tharp. "We feel like when we write a penalty and write a rules violation, there needs to be something behind it.

"While we are disappointed in today's outcome, we stand firmly behind our inspection process," he added. "We take this ruling and we move on to Darlington."

Tharp insisted that penalising a team for elements outside its immediate control was harsh, but unavoidable.

"In violations such as these, we have no other recourse in the reinforcement process than to penalise the team owner and team members," he explained. "That's how our system works. The responsibility for such infractions falls on their shoulders. Our intensity and approach to inspecting engines will not change.

Joe Gibbs appeared subdued when speaking to the media afterwards: “This has been a tough, tough week for everyone and certainly no one wanted this to happen,” the team owner said. "We're committed to make sure that it never happens in the future.

“I want to emphasize, after going through this process, we have great respect for our sport and in particular NASCAR. All of us at Joe Gibbs Racing are committed to being good partners and we want to race with NASCAR forever," he continued. "We're going to work extremely hard with TRD to make sure that this never happens again. Right now, we just want to get back to racing."

Matt Kenseth's Twitter posting similarly conveyed a sense of relief that the matter was over: "Glad to have today behind us so we can get our focus back on racing. I respect NASCAR and the appeals process, I feel like they got it right," he wrote.

The official statement from the appeals panel detailing the outcome of the hearing offered no commentary on how it had arrived at the decision to reduce or rescind most of JGR penalties, or why the $200,000 fine remained.

The sanctioning body does not have any right of appeal, and JRG has already said that it is happy with the outcome of today's hearing and will not be taking the matter any further and will accept the reduced penalties handed down by today's panel.

The day before the JGR hearing, NASCAR's six-race suspensions of key Penske Racing staff for using unapproved rear suspension parts at the previous race in Texas had also been reduced to two races upon final appeal to the series' chief appellate officer John Middlebrook, making it a double blow for NASCAR's regulatory approach in 2013. (See separate story.)




Related Pictures

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Matt Kenseth (L), driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, and Jeff Gordon (R), driver of the #24 Drive To End Hunger Chevrolet, talk in the garage during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway on April 26, 2013 in Richmond, Virginia. (Photo by Justin Edmonds/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, gets out of his car after qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway on April 26, 2013 in Richmond, Virginia. (Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images)
Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, stands in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 at Daytona International Speedway on February 20, 2013 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Dollar General Toyota, during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 at Daytona International Speedway on February 16, 2013 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)
Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 The Home Depot/Husky Toyota, celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series STP 400 at Kansas Speedway on April 21, 2013 in Kansas City, Kansas. (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)
Denny Hamlin and Darian Grubb, the crew chief of the #11 Joe Gibb Racing Toyota, consult in the garage area during testing at Charlotte Motor Speedway. (Photo Credit: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images for NASCAR)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet SS, races to win Sunday, July 27, 2014 the Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. Gordon, who leads the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings, has won at the Brickyard a record 5 times, the first one in 1994. (Photo by Christa L. Thomas/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet SS, races to win Sunday, July 27, 2014 the Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. Gordon, who leads the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings, has won at the Brickyard a record 5 times, the first one in 1994. (Photo by Harold Hinson/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet SS, celebrates his win Sunday, July 27, 2014 of the Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. Gordon, who leads the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings, has won at the Brickyard a record 5 times, the first one in 1994. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet SS, kisses the Brick after his win Sunday, July 27, 2014 of the Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. Gordon, who leads the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (NSCS) standings, has won at the Brickyard a record 5 times, the first one in 1994. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
The #24 Axalta Chevrolet crew celebrates in pit lane after driver Jeff Godron`s victory in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Crown Royal Presents The John Wayne Walding 400 at the Brickyard Indianapolis Motor Speedway on July 27, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo Credit: Matt Sullivan/Getty Images)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet, salutes the fans after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Crown Royal Presents The John Wayne Walding 400 at the Brickyard Indianapolis Motor Speedway on July 27, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo Credit: Matt Sullivan/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet, races the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Crown Royal Presents The John Wayne Walding 400 at the Brickyard Indianapolis Motor Speedway on July 27, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana.  (Photo Credit: Patrick Smith/NASCAR via Getty Images)
Kyle Busch, driver of the #54 Monster Energy Toyota, and Matt Kenseth, driver of the #20 Resers Toyota, lead the field at the start of the NASCAR Nationwide Series Lilly Diabetes 250 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on July 26, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo Credit: Andy Lyons/NASCAR via Getty Images)
The Richard Childress Racing #3 Chevrolet Nationwide Series car driven by Ty Dillon. (Photo Credit: Getty Images for NASCAR)
Tony Stewart, driver of the #14 Mobil 1/Bass Pro Shops Chevrolet SS, qualified sixth fastest Saturday, July 26, 2014 for Sunday`s Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Ryan Newman, driver of the #31 Quicken Loans Chevrolet SS, qualified fourth fastest Saturday, July 26, 2014 for Sunday`s Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Rusty Jarrett/HHP for Chevy Racing)
Jeff Gordon, driver of the #24 Axalta Chevrolet SS, qualified 2nd fastest Saturday, July 26, 2014 for Sunday`s Brickyard 400 Nascar Sprint Cup race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana. Next to him on the front row will be pole winner Kevin Harvick, driver of the #4 Jimmy John’s Chevrolet SS. (Photo by Harold Hinson/HHP for Chevy Racing)

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Amigo - Unregistered

May 09, 2013 7:26 PM

Three grams under the required minimum legal weight costs $ 200,000 fine and 12 points for driver and constructor is just making money from NASCAR. There's no advantage for 3 grams less weight. Driver should not take responsible for engine parts because he does not get advantage from very small error weight and he is just driver.



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