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New rules require teams to give '100 per cent'

"This is day one of this phase of NASCAR and its responsibility to the fans and to the industry of regulating the sport around this topic," he added. "But these are some examples, and these are the ones that we shared with the teams."

NASCAR also announced that from this weekend, only one spotter per car would be allowed to work on each spotters' stand and would only be allowed analogue radios to communicate with the team - digital communications devices, which can be encrypted and therefore used to set up covert team orders, are no longer permitted. In addition, spotters' stands will now be covered by a video camera to monitor activities.

NASCAR is also expected to issue new guidance and instructions covering restarts in time for Sunday's GEICO 400 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race, an issue that has been festering for much of the season.

Helton added that the drivers and teams appeared to be broadly supportive of the new regulations being brought in, and all too aware of the need to maintain the integrity of the sport after the events of the last seven days.

"There's been a lot of dialogue since last Saturday night throughout the garage," he said. "I would define this meeting as they were very attentive and probably was the most broadly listened-to conversation we've had in a while in that collective group.

"It was an open dialogue back and forth. We certainly laid down where we were and what we were intending to do going forward. Brian addressed them on the character of the sport and the necessity for us protecting it," he added.

“We wanted to be very clear, and we wanted to reinforce, frankly, the cornerstone of NASCAR, which is giving your all,” France added. "That's what our fans expect, and that's what the drivers want to do as well, so that was the centrepiece.

"My hope is that we'll have greater, greater, clarity, and we'll have that line as bright as possible because we're about delivering for our fans what they expect - and that's the best racing," he added. "That's the cornerstone of any sport."

"I think everyone should have a pretty clear understanding of what that is now," commented Paul Wolfe, crew chief of Brad Keselowski's #2 Penske Racing car. "If you go out there and run 100 per cent to your ability and run a normal race then everything will be fine.

"I think a lot of it is just common sense," he added. "I think it got everyone's attention. Like I said, I don't expect it to be a big deal moving forward."



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Chad Knaus (R), crew chief of the #48 Lowe`s Chevrolet, congratulates Paul Wolfe (L), crew chief of the #2 Miller Lite Dodge, after winning the series championship and finishing in fifteenth place for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 18, 2012 in Homestead, Florida. (Photo Credit: Todd Warshaw/Getty Images for NASCAR)
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Satan

September 15, 2013 8:01 PM

If there was no such thing the the Chase, then this rule would never need to exist. The Chase is the most ridiculous thing in motorsport ever conceived... it locks out those outside the top 10 from improving their championship position and it penalises the guy on top.

Gecko

September 15, 2013 3:56 PM

Nascar is a farce already, how come they have to come up with stupid rules like this anyway. Nascar were the ones that started this manipulation of races, with improvised safety cars, for "debris on the track" or "having to check for oil", when all they want to do is bring all the cars back into the TV picture. When they do this strategy of the teams goes out the window, and there races are spoiled. Nascar get your own act back into line before stupid "mikey mouse" regulations.



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