Q:
Mads, we're going to start with you because we look back to Portugal and with everything that happened at the end of the event you finished second, and then we had Mikko Hirvonen excluded and you took your first WRC win, so congratulations for that. But how did you feel; I'm sure you wanted your first win to be something special.

Mads Ostberg:
Well, that's definitely true. I wanted to fight for my first victory. Well, we didn't, we settled for a second in Portugal and we're really happy with the good rally. And then after the rally everything was changed, and okay, it's not the way I wanted it to be. Okay, there's nothing we can do about it, and we just have to be happy about the extra points in the Championship and take it as it is. But I still want to fight for a victory next time. Hopefully I can do that as soon as possible.
Q:
Here?

Mads Ostberg:
Well, not here, I think. I don't have enough experience on this event. Lots of things can happen in this event, it's very long and it seems it's going be very tricky. So I think it's important to go a little bit steady and come to the end; for sure, lots of things will happen and everything is possible. We're not starting the rally fighting for the first position.
Q:
That must have been be a good boost to your confidence; that you performed so well in Portugal. A lot of people fell by the way, but you took away a great resut. Did it boost your confidence?

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Mads Ostberg:
Well, yeah, the second position did. Moving up to first didn't give me any extra boost. It was still the same and I was happy with what we did to come second and it was definitely a good rally for us, without any troubles. We just did what we had to do to finish, so that was good and we saw that we can cope with difficult conditions for a long period. I think we will find a bit the same here.
Q:
Well, that's going stand you in good stead here, because it does look like it's going to be a difficult weekend in terms of the conditions. What's it been like out on the recce?

Mads Ostberg:
It's been a bit up and down, some of the stages have been quite good, in other stages we had rain and fog and quite rough conditions, so I think a lot will depend on the weather. Many of the stages are soft anyway, and as far as I rememer they're a bit rougher than last year. It will be tricky conditions, even if we don't have rain. I think it'll be very tough anyway.
Q:
Mads, what do you think is going to be the biggest challenge out there this weekend?

Mads Ostberg:
I think, to be honest, the stages are very likely to be foggy and rainy. Some of the stages, specially El Condor and the other stage, I don't remember the name, up to that stage, is very narrow with a lot of stones and I think it's very likely to have fog, and I think that will be a very big challenge, like we saw in Portugal on Friday when we had the fog. And rain; things happen very quickly. I think you need to be a bit clever on those stages where you have fog and you have rain, because it's all about being consistent and getting through the stages. Of course, it's different drivers at different speeds and maybe what's consistent and safe for me is slower than many others. I think I will stay on my safe speed, at least on the tricky stages. If it clears up and gets a bit easier, then for sure we need to push straight away.
Q:
S?bastien even with the changes to the regulations, you still selected first on the road when given the option. Do you think it's going be the place to be?

Sebastien Loeb:
I hope so. I don't know, if we start with rain, or not, but if you start 15th on the road, maybe you lose a lot of time. Sometimes the first place is the best. I hope it will be tomorrow. True we'll have to start in the night [darkness] in the morning, the rivals for the Championship chose the third and fourth positions, and they will all be in the night too.
Q:
We could have fog as well tomorrow morning. That could make things incredibly tricky out there.

Sebastien Loeb:
Yeah, of course. If it's dark and foggy... and there's a long stage, with lots of stones on the side, it'll be interesting.
Q:
We didn't see a lot of you in Portugal, unfortunately, but despite that you still lead the Championship, so it's not all bad in that sense.

Sebastien Loeb:
No, it's true. I retired very early in the rally, but the others were doing the same. We're still leading, not for a big gap though.
Q:
Talk to me about what you think about the event here in Argentina now that it's changed and we have many more kilometers. Is it a good thing and what are the stages like?

Sebastien Loeb:
The long stage is very different, it's special, so I like it.
Q:
There's a lot of talk about fog. There always is when we get to Argentina, it seems. Yesterday there was fog on the stages when you were doing the recce, is it difficult then to make notes in the fog?

Sebastien Loeb:
Yes, but I was quite lucky. There was a lot of fog in one stage [El Condor] that we know very well. We have the notes, it's not a big problem. But we had to take the notes of one of the new stages in the fog. Luckily, the second pass was okay, so we were able to have some correct notes. So it should be okay. But driving in the fog is very tricky. If you have just enough visibility it's okay, but sometimes when you have 20-meters visibility, you can do nearly nothing. Then, anything can happen.
Q:
Malcolm, Portugal, as S?bastien referenced, wasn't the best for Ford. You had two drivers, one after the other off the stages. You did come away with points though, but then another week later you hear Jari-Matti has broken his collarbone. Has it been a black few weeks, or is there light at the end of the tunnel?

Malcolm Wilson:
Oh, there's light at the end of the tunnel, I mean, you can imagine Portugal was a big disappointment for everybody on the team because we were given a good opportunity. I think we were lucky to come away with some good points. And we were obviously really looking forward to here as well, because we were really competitive in Mexico and these are two places where we've probably struggled a bit in the past. But then of course I got the phone call about Jari. So obviously the priority was to make sure we could make him fit for Greece. And then of course the next challenge was to find a replacement for him.
Q:
What kind of group of drivers were you looking at to replace Jari-Matti? How many drivers were you looking at before you decided on Dani Sordo?

Malcolm Wilson:
I think everybody knows we've got a fantastic group of youngsters with Mads [Ostberg], Evgeny [Novikov] and Ott [T?nak] and obviously serious consideration was given to those people. But that presents another problem because if we transferred one of those drivers to the main Ford team we'd still have to find someone else for the customer team. And we obviously looked at all the drivers' history on this event. So, that's the decision that we decided to take with the Championship still in its early days; we tried to find the strongest team that we possibly could.
Q:
Malcolm, what are the instructions this weekend to both Petter and Dani? Is it just a case of getting through the event, or are they out to win?

Malcolm Wilson:
No, for sure, we want to try and win. We need to win events and that will be the big push, to try and find a way to win this event. I think, as everybody pointed out, it's going be a difficult rally. I don't see it as an endurance rally, but with an extra 160 kilometres, I think then you have to be more mindful of where to push and where not to. I think it's going to be so easy to get caught out, as they say, with so many rocks on the side of the road, but both our drivers will be pushing to try and win the event.
Q:
Jari-Matti isn't here, but we know he likes to have a lot of input into the way things go during the weekend. Has he given you any advice Malcolm?

Malcolm Wilson:
Well, I told him to give me a call anytime during the event, but I have received nothing from him yet.
Q:
And he will be back in Greece, yes?

Malcolm Wilson:
That is the plan, yes. I don't see any reason why he won't be able to start in Greece.
Q:
The Championship's still in its early days, as you say, but Petter Solberg is just four points adrift of S?bastien Loeb. Does the balance shift in the team now to put more focus on Petter for the Drivers' Championship now that Jari-Matti won't get points from here and hasn't got points from quite a few events?

Malcolm Wilson:
How did I know you were going ask that question! No, it doesn't change anything for sure, I mean, we're going with our strategy as the season unfolds. I think you need to be very clear for us to win the Championship for Manufacturers, we're going to have to win rallies. We've seen this year that Jari has the pace to do that, so for sure we're running him back in the car as soon as possible. If it means we have to alter our strategies later, we will do that as well.
Q:
Do you feel Petter has the pace to win rallies?

Malcolm Wilson:
Well, he's certainly fitted very well in the team and he's driving very well. And he's getting more and more confident as he works with everybody, so hopefully he can.
Q:
Paulo, welcome to the press conference. This is probably the closest we are going to get to a home event for you here in Argentina. Brazil is not too far. How much are you looking forward to competing in front of what probably are the most passionate fans in the Championship?

Paulo Nobre:
First of all thank you very much to invite me to this press conference. This is really funny, it is really an honour to be together with these big guys of the rally here, thank you very much. Argentina and Brazil they have a big rivalry in soccer but when you come to rally this disappears. People from the fans in Argentina they love so much rally that they treat really, really well everybody who comes here to race. It is not my first time here. I raced in 2006, it was my debut, and for the South American Championship I came many times and they are really kind with us, so it is nice because they know rally, they like rally and they support everybody who races here.
Q:
Talk to me about what you think of the stages here this weekend; have you competed on a rally similar to this in terms of length or longer?

Paulo Nobre:
This rally is the longest that I did in my career. Talking about cross country we made some timed special stage with eight hundred kilometres, but talking about rally a 65 kilometre stage is something really different. But the smaller special stages like Condor Copina for example, it is really, really difficult and if you have fog it is almost a lottery. The pace notes are really, really important and I remember - I don't know how many years ago - Colin McRae made one special stage in the fog and he was like much faster than the others because of the recce, so I think the pace note is really important not just for the longer special stages but for the smaller ones with lots of rocks and really, really tricky special stages. Rally Argentina is a survival rally for sure so whoever manages not to have big problems and comes to the end with a constant speed will have a good result for sure.
Q:
What is going to be your approach to this event, Paulo? We saw in Portugal that shakedown didn't go quite so well and you couldn't start the event unfortunately. Were there some nerves before shakedown this time around?

Paulo Nobre:
I was really, really nervous. If you look at Portugal I didn't even start the race. Argentina is a little better because we didn't have any problem in the qualification. But before that I had Mexico that I didn't finish, and Sweden that I didn't finish, so my goal here is to go to the end. It is really important to have one race without a big problem so your confidence starts to return and you start to grow up your speed. Of course I cannot compete with these guys here and this year for me is about learning and it was really interesting until the problems started so my focus is to make a clean classification.