Ten-year-old Indonesian fan Shaina Salvia interviewed MV Agusta World Superbike star Leon Camier last time out at Sepang...

Shaina Salvia A.S.:
How was the second race for you?

Leon Camier:
It was difficult because even in the rain we were losing a lot on top speed. So I wasn't expecting something amazing. I was hoping for a little better than ninth, but we've got some good ideas and a lot of information for the next race.

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Shaina:
How do you prepare for a wet race like today?

Leon Camier:
The biggest thing is the setting of the bike. To be ready for the wet conditions you have to change your mind-set a bit, ride more smooth and calm. You also have to understand how the tyre is working and be ready to respond with the electronics as well. We can adjust the electronics while we are riding the bike, for example if you have too much control kicking in or engine brake. I made a few changes but the setting wasn't perfect for the rain, so it's something we can improve.

Shaina:
How was the new track surface in the wet?

Leon Camier:
Some tracks like Donington or Assen are really difficult when it rains, but this track has really good grip and once you get into a rhythm it's quite good fun. You can get good lean angle and push hard. The race was also our first wet session of the weekend, so we were learning as we were riding.

Shaina:
You've raced many different bikes in WSBK since 2009, how difficult is it when you do not have a competitive bike?

Leon Camier:
I've had some highs and lows, but I still feel there's a lot more potential. I still think we can race at the front, be competitive and try to win races in the right situation. It's difficult at the moment to do that. With the MV, it's really an undeveloped bike. There's a lot of potential, but we need a lot more power and a lot more time. But with the information they are getting now I think in the next two or three years they can make a strong bike.

Shaina:
How has the bike improved this year?

Leon Camier:
We have a new fuel tank, which puts the weight a lot lower and also more to the back. So over the race distance the bike is a lot more balanced, which is really important. Apart from that some small changes like a different exhaust, the electronics have improved a lot and some stuff internally in the engine.

We've definitely made some good progress. But as I say we need a lot more, because there are a few areas where we are missing a lot. I think if we can get some more power and acceleration from the bike we can make a big step. That is our biggest problem, especially at a track like this with the long straights. So hopefully for the next races we can make some good progress in that area.

Shaina:
Do you think MV Agusta will race in MotoGP again one day?

Leon Camier:
Hopefully, but I don't think they have any plans at the minute to race in MotoGP. For them as a factory they'd need a lot of money to make a MotoGP bike. Now they are in World Superbike and the bike is getting stronger. So in the next ten years maybe, but at the moment I think they will concentrate on World Superbike.

Shaina:
You are much taller than the other riders, does that mean the team makes the bike setting different for you?

Leon Camier:
Yeah my position on the bike is a little bit different, like handlebars and seat, but the MV is quite big anyway so it works well for me. I feel really comfortable on the bike. As for the settings of things like the suspension, every rider is different anyway. Nothing crazily different for me. We've got a good setting now, so my height and size doesn't make much difference.

Shaina:
When you were at school, which subjects did you like?

Leon Camier:
I liked none of it at school! Maybe sport would have been my best. School wasn't my strong point. I was busy racing when I was at school. I'd come back and I'd always be behind in my classes and homework, then I'd go away racing again. I think I missed some of my exams because I was racing in 125cc grand prix. For me, it was better to race grands prix than be at school!

Shaina:
Now you are going to your home race in England, what is your target?

Leon Camier:
It's very easy to put more pressure on yourself in your home race, and then it's easy to make mistakes, crash and have a bad weekend. If you set the target really high and don't achieve it you can feel negative, frustrated and angry. You have to stay calm. We'll see what happens. For sure Donington should be better for our bike. A top six would be an amazing result.