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Haslam fractures tibia, may not race

Leon Haslam joins the list of walking wounded as a fracture to his tibia threatens to rule him out of the opening World Superbike round at Phillip Island.
Leon Haslam will wait for the outcome of surgery on his fracture tibia before deciding whether to compete in the opening round of the 2012 World Superbike Championship.

Haslam fell at the high-speed final corner on the first day of official WSBK testing at Phillip Island, the Briton landing heavily on his feet. However, while it was initially feared he had injured his heel, further tests reveal he has suffered a fractured right tibia, as well as a broken bone in his left foot.

The BMW rider will now undergo surgery to have a screw and plate inserted to fix the fragment in its original place, an operation that threatens his participation in the 2012 season opener in less than four days' time.

A bitter blow for Haslam, who has been consistently inside the top five during testing so far and was a winner at Phillip Island in 2010, he is now hoping a successful surgery will allow him to soldier on this coming weekend.

“This is just a disappointing situation, as we were making good progress,” he said. “Right from the start my lap times were not bad. The crash was quite a big high-sider just before the start-finish-straight. I landed on my heels, and I thought I could have fractured them.

“The scans later showed I had fractured the end of my right tibia instead. On top of this, I broke a small bone in my left foot, but this should not be a big issue. I now shall keep my fingers crossed that the surgery goes well and I will be back on the bike very soon.”

Haslam becomes the fourth ride to suffer an injury during testing at Phillip Island, with John Hopkins, Eugene Laverty and David Salom all breaking bones last week. As yet, Hopkins is the only rider to withdraw, while Laverty will leave his decision until the eve of the event and Salom is expected to race on.


Tagged as: BMW , Phillip Island , Leon Haslam

Related Pictures

Click on relevant pic to enlarge
Haslam, Australian WSBK tests and race, February 2012
Haslam, Australian WSBK tests and race, February 2012
Haslam, Australian WSBK tests and race, February 2012
Haslam, Phillip Island WSBK tests, Jan 13-14 2012
Haslam, Phillip Island WSBK tests, Jan 13-14 2012
Haslam injured, Australian WSBK tests and race, February 2012
Haslam, WSBK Race2, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, WSBK Race2, Qatar WSBK 2016
Shanley and Ron Haslam, WSBK Race2, Qatar 2016
Haslam, WSBK Race2, Qatar WSBK 2016
Jonathan Rea and Haslam, WSBK Race1, Qatar WSBK 2016
Jonathan Rea and Haslam, WSBK Race1, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, WSBK Race1, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, WSBK Race1, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, Qatar WSBK 2016
Haslam, Qatar WSBK 2016

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Pizdoff - Unregistered

February 20, 2012 1:42 PM

Yep. Its like you festoon the bike with electronics and the riders will still take it just as close to the edge. Only now - with all the electronics - the edge when they finally step off it is higher than it was before.

JimScott - Unregistered

February 20, 2012 12:54 PM

These riders seem to be pushing and pushing using all the electronics available to them creating a false feel of grip. They"re opening the throttle quicker and aggressive something you would never do without the fly bye wire system and they are getting caught out more and more almost as if surprised by being thrown off. Old school 500s was if you turned the throttle that quick you would be prepared for the catapulting from your actions.



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